As search engines have become more prominent, some affiliate marketers have shifted from sending e-mail spam to creating automatically generated web pages that often contain product data feeds provided by merchants. The goal of such web pages is to manipulate the relevancy or prominence of resources indexed by a search engine, also known as spamdexing. Each page can be targeted to a different niche market through the use of specific keywords, with the result being a skewed form of search engine optimization.

When comparing dropshipping vs affiliate marketing, dropshipping tends to be a little less risky in various ways. First, like an affiliate marketing business, dropshipping doesn’t carry inventory nor does it ship goods. This makes both models pretty low risk. However, with dropshipping, the risk is even lower as your funds become available each week. With an affiliate marketing business, there may be thresholds you need to reach before you can cash out your first cheque. For example, if you’re an Amazon affiliate outside of the US, you can only be paid by cheque or gift card. However, to receive the cheque you must have made at least $100. Yet, not everyone succeeds at making $100, when the percentages are really low. With dropshipping, you get paid what you made.


When doing a comparison between dropshipping vs affiliate marketing, the biggest disadvantage of affiliate marketing is you’re paid on commission. You might’ve just spent $100 in ads only to make $50 back in commission fees. The payout for affiliate commissions is generally a lot lower than dropshipping. Even if your commissions are several hundred dollars, odds are the cost of the product is higher. This means finding the right people will cost more as well. Also, you don’t have the opportunity to set the price. For example, if people are interested in the product but feel the cost is too high, you can’t lower it to meet the demand of your audience. In addition, since you can’t set the price of your earnings, you’ll likely make a lot less than if you were the merchant.
“I emailed each partner via a mass broadcast email to let them know to stop sending traffic. I chose that route immediately because it informed everyone quickly, and allowed them time to stop sending their highly-targeted traffic to an offer not making them any money. After the broadcast, I began to personally call, Skype, Facebook, and text all the contacts one at a time. I wanted to ensure them we were doing everything possible to make things right, and thank them for their support,” he said.
Paid marketing, on the other hand, involves purchasing ads on websites or search engines. If you’ve recently used Google to search for something, you may have noticed the first two or three results are paid for by companies. By paying for ads, you have better control over who gets to see your ads: people who input certain keywords, people who visit specific sites, people who belong to a particular demographic, and so on. Online advertising companies such as Google gives businesses a whole platform to create ad campaigns and monitor their effectiveness.
We can’t stress the importance of this enough. Effective PPC campaigns use keywords that are competitive and popular. Remember, you’ll be shelling out money to put on ads, so your keywords have to be high-intent; meaning, the people using those keywords are the ones most likely to follow through on their action. They need to be specific and targeted, while at the same time allow flexibility.
This is the #1 mistake affiliates make with email marketing. While it’s great to have a list to sell to, you don’t want to be selling all the time. Break up the stream of email sales offers with some content. Aim for about an 80/20 split. That would be four straight emails that give great content to your reader and then one email of take, which is the selling part.
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