Love your article on drop shipping vs. affiliate marketing. I joined the WA community in summer of last year and while I haven’t made any real money yet besides a little bit from google Adsense I am enjoying the journey. I have been looking into ways to expand and looked at drop shipping. It certainly does seem to be more “hands on” than what I was wanting to do, especially since I keep myself pretty busy and am stretched to post a few blogs a week to continue to try to build my website.
*Yes: As you may have guessed, the link above is my two-tier affiliate link. There are a few of these links on this site to pay me a small commission and allow me to keep this site free instead of a monthly membership site. Using my two-tier affiliate link will not affect the amount of commission paid to you with this or any other program. My commissions are paid out of the vendor’s cut, not yours.
If you don’t already know what drop shipping is, it’s the retail method in which you don’t keep products in stock. Instead of warehousing, you partner with a drop shipping supplier that stocks its own inventory.  You transfer customer orders and shipment details to them, and the suppliers ship the order directly to the customer. Here’s a graph to help you understand the drop shipping business model:
For example, say you want to sell tablet cases for the new iPad. You find a distributor willing to sell them to you for $10 each. You take them to your storefront and make a product listing for that product at $20. You go about doing the marketing, the outreach, and the customer engagement necessary to make people aware of your site and your storefront.
SkimLinks works very similarly to VigLinks in that it is designed for bloggers who don’t want to do a lot of hands-on work to participate in an affiliate program. SkimLinks also works much like VigLinks in that it uses a plugin or script to create dynamic links in your content to send visitors to higher paying offers from merchants. SkimLinks claims to work with over 24,000 merchants/advertisers.
Great graphic!! There is an online affliate marketing business opportunity that seems to be pretty comprehensive. They manage all of the affliate merchants for me and I leverage an online portal to send customers through. And I can link that portal to my blogs, facebook page, twitter, etc. They manager over 3,000 partner stores and it seems to be growing everyday. Pretty cool so far. I love to shop online so this was a great business opportunity for me. And they have their own brokered products too. I think affliate marketing is just going to keep growing as businesses go from brick and mortar to click and order!
So as an affiliate marketer, you have to build a compelling website, attract traffic to that website, and retain a consistent audience in order to sell ads. Then, you join an affiliate network like Amazon or eBay, and they show ads on your site. It’s important to note that affiliates don’t earn money by simply serving ads. They have to direct qualified traffic to a company’s site so that the company can earn more in sales.

You say that when people make says from your affiliate link it can be a one time transaction however you failed to mention list building which is crucial if you want to make a full time income strictly off of affiliate marketing. I also disagree with your notion that affiliate marketing is not a real business. You can still brand yourself and build credibility even if you don’t own your own product.

As mentioned above, affiliates are incentivised to introduce your brand and direct users to your website. They may do this by writing a blog post about your newest or top-selling products, or your current promotion. Affiliates may feature banner ads on their site that drive users to your store, or offer coupon codes as incentives to users to purchase the product after visiting their site.
The process is very simple: you send people to Amazon (or another affiliate program) using a special link, which puts a cookie on their machine and tags their purchases with your affiliate code. When they buy something, you get a cut of the profit – starting at 4%, I believe – because you referred them. You don’t need to do anything else. You don’t ship anything, you don’t handle customer service, you don’t even need to make yourself a trustworthy storefront. All you need to do is get people to click through and buy.
Focus on reviewing products that fall within your niche. Then, leveraging the rapport you have created with your audience and your stance as an expert, tell your readers why they would benefit from purchasing the product you are promoting. It is especially effective to compare this product to others in the same category. Most importantly, make sure you are generating detailed, articulate content to improve conversions.
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