When it comes to making a living out of promoting and selling products online, most people who don’t sell their own goods fall into one of two categories: Affiliate Marketing and Dropshipping. Both require the advertiser to promote the marketing of the products, with the crucial difference that dropshipping allows you to set your own prices. This means that with dropshipping, you get the profits, whereas, with affiliate marketing, you get a commission. This may sound like a huge advantage; however, it’s a little more complicated than that. Let’s first take a look at all the similarities between dropshipping and affiliate marketing.
Wow!  You wouldn’t believe how long it took to write this post.  (Almost 10 hours – Including the sample emails.)  Hopefully I did a good job of explaining what it takes to create a great series of email messages.  Like I said in the introduction, this is the exact mechanisms I use to make money.  So I’d definitely recommend learning all you can about email marketing.
Dropshipping does have the primary drawback that there is a lot of existing competition. If you’re trying to sell $10 tablet cases for $20, you can bet there are other people out there trying to do the same thing. Some of them might price their cases at $15, in which case you have to ask yourself; why would a user buy from me rather than from them? What value do I add for $5 that the competition cannot? Often, you have nothing tangible, so you have to provide that value in terms of information and trust.
When deciding between dropshipping vs affiliate marketing consider how much money you can actually make. The commissions in an affiliate marketing business can often be low in comparison to a dropshipping model. When dropshipping, you can buy a product that costs $1 and sell it for $19.99, which allows you to keep a substantial portion of the profit after marketing costs have been subtracted.
The merchant is the retailer or brand that is trying to attract users or make sales. The network is the store which contains offers for the affiliates to chose from and handles the payments. The publisher is the affiliate who is producing content that attracts users or managing the website that your ads appear on. The customer is the user who visits the affiliates website then is referred to the merchant website and converts.
As with many things in life, affiliate marketing benefits from quality over quantity. Having many affiliates that drive traffic can be seen as a good thing, but this may spread your team too thin preventing them from focusing on the quality affiliates that are generating the most conversions, especially since the strategy and marketing collateral most likely won’t be the same for each affiliate.
Simply put, affiliate programs, also called associate programs, are arrangements in which an online merchant Web site pays affiliate Web sites a commission to send them traffic. These affiliate Web sites post links to the merchant site and are paid according to a particular agreement. This agreement is usually based on the number of people the affiliate sends to the merchant's site, or the number of people they send who buy something or perform some other action. Some arrangements pay according to the number of people who visit the page containing their merchant site's banner advertisement. Basically, if a link on an affiliate site brings the merchant site traffic or money, the merchant site pays the affiliate site according to their agreement. Recruiting affiliates is an excellent way to sell products online, but it can also be a cheap and effective marketing strategy; it's a good way to get the word out about your site.
Brands are using both types of marketing effectively. Both channels are useful for boosting a brand’s business and market share, so don’t feel as if you have to limit yourself to one or the other. If you aren’t already incorporating both influencers and affiliates into your marketing strategy, you’re missing out on some of the best possible opportunities to grow sales and brand awareness.
I was able to make my first online dollars through Amazon Affiliate sales… It was never much and in the beginning I was just excited to make $10 in a month, which was enough for a free ebook or two. With regular updates and link inclusions in my posts over time I was able to grow the number up to like $300 a month–which I was pretty happy with. Of course the payout rates are paltry compared to a sale of an info product like one from Unconventional Guides, etc. Thing is, people seem to be more open to purchasing physical products rather than information products…
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