Hi Jamie, awesome content that is very helpful esp with the resources, links and the rich discussions. Want to start e-commerce and blog for money…selling others products, want to go full on with this, tired of the daily routine crunch working for others. I live in a developing country (PNG) that has high internet costs (work still in progress with getting rates down…) so will see how I go with your posts. Any advise? Don’t have a website yet, have to build one I guess….
Thank you for your comments. My wife and I are interested in going the affiliate marketing route as well. What we need now are the specifics on how to set up and structure the affiliate marketing business relationships with vendors / sellers / manufacturers. What agreement(s) govern these relationships? What are the steps to going from where we are now, at square one and no current relationships with sellers, to having binding contractual relationships and receiving checks in the mail? Can anyone give us the play by play on this process?
You say that when people make says from your affiliate link it can be a one time transaction however you failed to mention list building which is crucial if you want to make a full time income strictly off of affiliate marketing. I also disagree with your notion that affiliate marketing is not a real business. You can still brand yourself and build credibility even if you don’t own your own product.
One benefit of affiliate marketing is the fact that you don’t have to spend time looking for affiliates that match the types of sites your target audience visits. There are affiliate marketing service providers, like ShareASale and FlexOffers, that connect you with businesses, manage payments, offer tracking tools and make sure your content only shows up on reputable sites.
Before I get into details, I’ll say one thing up front; both are perfectly viable business strategies. They both have checkered pasts with spammy abuse and high quality use. The difference between them comes in infrastructure and setup, as well as how you go about managing the business you create. Neither is inherently better than the other; it comes down to what you want out of the business, what you’re willing to put in, and which system seems more appealing to you.
“You need to be competitive. Do your homework and determine what other similar offers are paying,” emphasized Nic DeHerrera, who has spent the past 12+ years in the ecommerce space — first, running a 24/7 contact center with 100+ employees, then filling different marketing positions and, over the past few years, managing an affiliate program with over 1,500 active affiliates.

Hi, I would recommend you to do Affiliate Marketing. I have tried Aliexpress as well but the big disadvantage with that program are the long shipping times, in general 20-40 days and customers want the product now. You will have lot of complaints about the delivery. Some people look down on Affiliate Marketing because they think you make only a few bucks per product. But if you are smart you only promote affiliate stuff with high payouts. I am involved in a program that pays up to $5000 per single sale. PM me if interested. Because you have to promote your products anyway, whether you advertise for a product where you make $1 from or a product you make $5000 from.


Paid advertising — this method requires an effective combination of ad copy, graphics, and a highly-clickable link.[30] Unlike more traditional affiliate marketing strategies, paid advertising (through pay-per-click ads) earn you money regardless of whether a reader buys the product or not. Services like Google's AdSense make this quick and easy for you, and can even supply you with an advertising code.[31]
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