Email newsletters, note the word ‘news’, are an informative piece of communication aimed at providing industry and company based news. A newsletter is a strong inbound marketing tool and whilst it may also include a call-to-action like email marketing campaigns, the main difference between the two is the aim of a newsletter is to engage and educate. The aim of an email marketing campaign is sales.
Despite its name, the CAN-SPAM Act doesn’t apply just to bulk email. It covers all commercial messages, which the law defines as “any electronic mail message the primary purpose of which is the commercial advertisement or promotion of a commercial product or service,” including email that promotes content on commercial websites. The law makes no exception for business-to-business email. That means all email – for example, a message to former customers announcing a new product line – must comply with the law.
What we liked: The automations included on the free plan are surprisingly advanced – you’ve got options to send abandoned cart campaigns, for example, and to perform actions such as moving subscribers to different lists or updating custom field values. In general, the simplicity of the tool is a nice change from the overcomplexity of other similarly-featured tools.

The Advisor Coach, James Pollard agrees. He mentions that he looks for events happening all around him. Saying, “ If you’re a marketer, nothing bad happens to you because everything can be used to create a compelling story. Also, it’s important to stay current with events in your industry. If you can be the first to tell people about a particular idea or topic, they will follow you even more”.
Molly K. McLaughlin is a New York-based writer and editor with more than a decade of experience covering technology. She has tested and reviewed all sorts of software, mobile apps, and gadgets. Before launching her freelance business, she was an editor at PC Magazine, covering consumer electronics, followed by a stint at ConsumerSearch.com, a revie... See Full Bio
Both MailChimp and GetResponse offer scoring tools to gauge the quality of your contacts, which makes it simple to determine who you should be contacting; used in tandem with automated workflows, you can easily set up segmented campaigns based on the quality of your subscribers, sending targeted messages to different recipients in order to increase engagement.
It’s as simple as this – why would you target your marketing at the 65+ age group, when it was designed for an 18 – 24-year-old audience? If the product has been designed for that audience, so too should the marketing. It’s just simple common sense. Sending targeted emails to the right demographic will, in theory, improve your chances of said demographic buying into the product. This could in turn improve your profits. How could anyone argue with that?
Clean Your List Regularly – On a regular basis, remove bounced emails, unsubscribes, and other non-deliverables from your list. When you send to these and they bounce back, it can trigger a block or filters on your emails to all addresses. Use an email validation service that will check for inactive accounts as well as duplicates, old domains, records that have requested no messages, honeypots designed to catch spam bots, and other issues that could hurt future deliverability rates.
Basic text-based email editors to fully designed HTML or JavaScript templates are just some of the features these packages can provide businesses. You can manage your contacts by simply keeping a list of names and email addresses or you can create a complex database full of subscribers segmented by demographic slices and engagement levels. Which method you choose really just depends on how much of your budget you're willing to allocate towards the email marketing software that can give your company the features it needs.
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