Think about mobile. If a campaign doesn't show up on mobile devices, it's not going to perform very well. Everything you send should be mobile-friendly. Check out ReturnPath's "Email in Motion" infographic for some data that might affect the way you design your emails. One of the highlights: According to the study, 63 percent of Americans and 41 percent of Europeans would either close or delete an email that's not optimized for mobile. Might be time to start using a responsive template.
If you’re new to this, you’re definitely going to face some personal resistance. After all, even if you have no hang-ups pestering people in their inbox, you’re still going to be putting your ideas and thoughts out into the world and that can be scary. We all hope that our content will be coherent, useful, not invasive or annoying and please god never offensive to anyone! For anyone who is not seasoned in the arena of public opinion, critique and criticism, putting yourself  “out there” in those first few articles or emails will be nerve-racking.
I’ve always been a mailchimp user myself, and I have to say I really like their UI but I’m always open to new options. I’ve dabbled in a couple of the other email marketing providers like Pure360 – but find them so clunky and annoying to use (despite them looking really pretty and having great templates) that I always end up going back to good old mailchimp. I haven’t used GetResponse yet, I’ll give their free trial a shot :)

According to a 2017 study, 55% of emails are now opened on mobile devices, which means providing a marketing experience that works on both desktop and mobile platforms is more essential than ever. Both of our top picks include the ability to automatically convert your desktop designs into mobile-friendly formats, and most other major companies do as well — Whichever service you choose, make sure it provides this function so that your emails will read the way you want them to, no matter what platform they’re being read from.
No matter what your opinion of mass emails is, I guarantee there are at least a few you actually enjoy receiving and do get real value from. The only emails that are annoying are ones that don’t pertain to you or your situation and needs. And as someone who sends them myself, I can assure you that we absolutely want you to unsubscribe if that’s the case. Nobody wants to annoy you with their business emails!

Everything's simpler in Mad Mimi. The email editor helps you search for stock photos, the audience tab shows all your contact details in a tabbed table similar to a spreadsheet, and its social tool lets you add your social profiles to every email automatically. And if that's not enough, click the Add Things button to add a form builder, RSS-to-email tool, drip campaigns, personalization tools, and more. That lets you make Mad Mimi an email newsletter with just the features you want.


When you send out spam, you can flip that number and you'll see less than 20% actually make it in, if that. So we recommend getting permission. Create a Signup Form and put it on your site. Sign up customers for your emails when they make a purchase. Whatever you do, make sure you have permission so that your email marketing campaigns aren't sent in vain.


Hamna Amjad from Ridester mentions, “The first step is to figure out your newsletter’s goal! It should totally be based on the sort of business you are in and your target audience. Next comes the content that would go in the newsletter which should be only 10% promotional and about 90% educational to build up your subscribers’ interest in your products rather than making them feel that you are selling all the time.”
If you’re not responsible for transactional email at your company, meet with the employee or team who is so that you’re gaining the full benefit of this practice. It’s crucial that you don’t overwhelm your transactional message with promotional content. Promotional messaging should only be added if it provides values to your recipient and if doesn’t detract from your transactional details.
Victor Bilandzic from Motava, explains that keeping emails short and sweet is key. He says, “Long-form emails are not read. For the various newsletters we manage, we have two approaches: 1. If the design is graphic-heavy: Only use a few lines of copy and a bold link to one external link or action we want the reader to take. 2. If the design is simple or text-only: Only a few paragraphs of copy with a plain text link at the bottom”.
If you want the simplest way to send an email newsletter, and don't have more than 5,000 subscribers, you can't get any simpler than Tinyletter. An insanely simple email newsletter app from the MailChimp team, Tinyletter has no email templates, no integrations with other apps, and almost no features—it's the only app on this list that doesn't include Zapier integrations. All it lets you do is make a landing page for people to signup, then write text-focused emails and send them to your subscribers in a click.
If you want to code your own emails, you have the freedom to do so. But this is an advanced skill that requires a good bit of technical know-how. Here’s what you need to take the coding leap—whether you’re just getting started, wondering about the basics of HTML emails, or looking for a guide to coding them. We’ve also rounded up a few more resources you might need as you become a certifiable email pro.
Their email campaign looks really good. The design has everything you want – fresh colors and clear design, a clear objective and minimalistic copy. They are doing a great job of keeping their emails very pointed with a clear CTA. In every letter, you will get guides to different cities. Like recently it was about Barcelona with its secret beaches and local places. 
Carl: Right, and so they’re giving you this information one step at a time to make sure you as a customer have time to process it and digest it. That’s much more user-friendly than just sending you like, “Here’s our startup guide”, in this like 30-page PDF. Right? So that’s the goal behind this email series that they have. Sometimes you’ll have companies who’s goal is to sell. 
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