This article is informative, but it does not offer distinguishing features between the services covered (other than mailchimp is free). You seemed to go to great lengths to say good things about each – although I’m sure each services has positive aspects. I would have benefited much more from a rating of some sort of the various features of each service, or at least the pros & cons of each.

It’s also important to look at what content has already done well for you. As this content will make a great addition to your newsletter. Amber Ooley from Thrive Internet Marketing Agency says, “I pull the top-performing blog posts and other content from the last week based on Google Analytics, website engagement, and social media shares. Then, I’ll craft it all into a consistent email template”.


You can add more detail to your emails with GetResponse, as well. It can import images from Flickr, Facebook, and iStock, sell products in emails with PayPal buttons, and even reuse text from previous emails with its snippets feature. Then, you can schedule your emails in advance by dragging them to the correct date on a calendar. And if you're promoting your products online, GetResponse has you covered with tools to import contacts from Facebook forms and Twitter ads. 

With Vero, users can track and store customer data and events in real-time. Using this information, you can create segments without having to do any coding and send out automated emails. For example, users who have just abandoned the shopping cart can be targeted with an email just hours or days later. In terms of deployment, Vero can be integrated with an email delivery provider, such as Sendgrid.
If you want the simplest way to send an email newsletter, and don't have more than 5,000 subscribers, you can't get any simpler than Tinyletter. An insanely simple email newsletter app from the MailChimp team, Tinyletter has no email templates, no integrations with other apps, and almost no features—it's the only app on this list that doesn't include Zapier integrations. All it lets you do is make a landing page for people to signup, then write text-focused emails and send them to your subscribers in a click.

Rather than relying on a series of commands listed one after another, GetResponse utilizes a more engaged and visual approach: Users drag and drop actions into the workflow, directly linking triggers and commands in a way that feels more like completing a connect-the-dots than setting up automated emails. This simplifies what can be an otherwise complex process and makes for one element of the GetResponse user experience that beats out MailChimp in terms of convenience.


Conventional wisdom says that business emails should be sent between 9am-6pm Tuesday-Thursday. Avoid Mondays when people are overwhelmed and Fridays when people are checked out. But in reality, because everyone does this, the vast majority of business emails are delivered between 11am-4pm on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. That’s a lot of volume in the middle of the week.
With more than 224 million users across the country, you may already know the answer. Yes—we’re talking about smartphone users. A whopping 47% of people open emails on their smartphone, according to the DMA. That’s beats 37% and 16% of people who open emails on desktop and tablet, respectively. The takeaway is mobile experience is absolutely critical to a successful email campaign.
For instance, I like getting the New York Times cooking recipes. My partner Steve enjoys getting updates on the latest shows added to Netflix. I would never want an email from Netflix telling me anything, instant unsubscribe! Does this mean Netflix doesn’t benefit from its email marketing? Of course not. I am not someone who enjoys their emails so their email content isn’t really for me. It also doesn't affect my use or enjoyment of their service so let’s dispel the fear that if someone doesn’t enjoy your email content they will not use your service. So whether you prefer Seth Godin’s marketing emails or Marie Forleo’s weekly videos, the point is that marketing emails are all about what you have to offer that your ideal customers want and need. Not what everyone wants.
Carl: Right. And then the other big pros and cons to the two is that, imagine you’re the marketer at MailChimp. You and your team go ahead and create this beautiful email drip. Once you’ve created this drip series, you can basically send it and forget it — in the sense that subscribers that join your list or become customers in a month from now, three months from now, or maybe even a year from now will still get this very viable email drip.
Haven’t used email marketing as much as I should. Previously, we tried using ImnicaMail because of their pricing but it was as good as not having an email marketing campaign; all our mail was sent to spam (since they did not manage their customers’ list for spam). Thought email marketing wasn’t effective until I found out our emails were being sent to the spam box. Learnt my lesson there.

Most human beings are at least curious over what other people are buying. If a product has a huge audience and gets tons of good marks from customers, most likely your recipient will be more inclined to buy it. For this reason, we believe that a "customer favorite" product, featured in a subject line, is an easy sell. To make this tactic even more effective, use this phrase in a list subject line.


Inactive Customers: Customers who have bought from you in the past but are no longer purchasing. These dormant customers require you to take a fresh angle and keep in touch via email asking them questions or inviting them to online webinars about your product or service. You can also send surveys to them to understand what’s stopping them from making a purchase.
As with every other email: Include a CTA. Don’t forget that dopamine:  Present them with a discount coupon and invite them to make another purchase with you, or invite them to refer their friends to you. Make it easy for them to do either, including providing links that take them straight through to a personalized shopping cart (to make the purchase, with the discount applied), or referral program (with their personalized sharing link displayed).
To ensure your email doesn’t get flagged as SPAM or junk by readers, consider implementing a permission-based approach. Permission marketing is essentially when a recipients have provided explicit consent that they want to receive your email communications – whether by sign-up or other opt-in mechanism. There are a number of things you can do to build an organic, opt-in marketing list. Read about these in my earlier blogs:
Think about mobile. If a campaign doesn't show up on mobile devices, it's not going to perform very well. Everything you send should be mobile-friendly. Check out ReturnPath's "Email in Motion" infographic for some data that might affect the way you design your emails. One of the highlights: According to the study, 63 percent of Americans and 41 percent of Europeans would either close or delete an email that's not optimized for mobile. Might be time to start using a responsive template.
In regards to recommendations, I’d probably try out MailerLite or MailChimp to begin with, they have relatively good subscriber and email limits, along with an easy to use system. MailerLite has some great features, such as landing pages and multiple languages, while still being wallet-friendly, even in their paid plans. MailChimp can get pretty pricey in their paid tiers but has some really great integration options.
A lot of components come together when sending out an email newsletter: a software or web application that creates the newsletter, and an email server that sends it out. Generally speaking, you’re free to manage each of these components separately. You can install the newsletter software on your server or client computer, and then use the email server provided by your web hosting provider (e.g. Namecheap or GoDaddy).
Getting started shouldn't be daunting. Generally, you'll know right away whether you like a user interface (UI) or not, and most of the contenders we reviewed offer free trials so you can poke around before dropping any cash. Luckily, most of these services have modern-looking graphics and uncluttered layouts. These are not the complex business software UIs of yesterday. Be careful, though, as some free trials require a credit card. This means you need to be sure to cancel your trial before you're billed if you're not happy with the service.

A. Each separate email in violation of the law is subject to penalties of up to $41,484, and more than one person may be held responsible for violations. For example, both the company whose product is promoted in the message and the company that originated the message may be legally responsible. Email that makes misleading claims about products or services also may be subject to laws outlawing deceptive advertising, like Section 5 of the FTC Act. The CAN-SPAM Act has certain aggravated violations that may give rise to additional fines. The law provides for criminal penalties – including imprisonment – for:
The CAN-SPAM Act of 2003 was passed by Congress as a direct response to the growing number of complaints over spam emails.[citation needed] Congress determined that the US government was showing an increased interest in the regulation of commercial electronic mail nationally, that those who send commercial emails should not mislead recipients over the source or content of them, and that all recipients of such emails have a right to decline them. The act authorizes a US $16,000 penalty per violation for spamming each individual recipient.[19] However, it does not ban spam emailing outright, but imposes laws on using deceptive marketing methods through headings which are "materially false or misleading". In addition there are conditions which email marketers must meet in terms of their format, their content and labeling. As a result, many commercial email marketers within the United States utilize a service or special software to ensure compliance with the act. A variety of older systems exist that do not ensure compliance with the act. To comply with the act's regulation of commercial email, services also typically require users to authenticate their return address and include a valid physical address, provide a one-click unsubscribe feature, and prohibit importing lists of purchased addresses that may not have given valid permission.[citation needed]
Likewise, there are also companies who sell "Email Marketing" or supposed opt-in email for much less than we do. All these companies are doing is SPAMMING people with your offer. These are the companies you see online selling millions of emails for $xxx. This is far less than what we even pay websites for co-registration data. Using these types of companies to email for you  will inevitably cause you major problems with your web hosting company and in fact can get your website shut down.
Whilst a bulk email marketing approach can have a positive effect upon click-through rates or overall traffic levels, what is this worth if the traffic is not of the right quality? There is no point spending money on generating traffic that isn’t going to convert into a sale, or whatever your end goal is. Targeted email marketing can deliver the relevant, high-quality traffic you need to improve chances of conversion.
Instead of showing the same form asking for their name and email address, Hubspot allows you to identify this lead and show a different offer, or ask a different set of questions to learn more about them over time. This is called Progressive profiling – and it allows you to send more personalised email campaigns as you gather more information on your leads.
If you run a brick-and-mortar business, you're likely sending emails about events and sales to get people to walk into your store. Even with a digital business, live webinars and time-limited discounts can help boost traffic. Constant Contact is an email app that's also great at managing all of those other things you do, so you can create events and promotions, send them out to your existing contacts, and gather new contacts—all from one app.

Active Trail is an automated communications platform that focuses on SMS and email marketing campaigns. It has a user-friendly newsletter and email editor with a drag-and-drop interface as well as an advanced image editor. Additionally, Active Trail includes predictive delivery which helps users predict the optimal time to send emails to their recipients. It also includes ready-to-use sign up and lead forms, A/B testing and Personalisation tools.


Despite its name, the CAN-SPAM Act doesn’t apply just to bulk email. It covers all commercial messages, which the law defines as “any electronic mail message the primary purpose of which is the commercial advertisement or promotion of a commercial product or service,” including email that promotes content on commercial websites. The law makes no exception for business-to-business email. That means all email – for example, a message to former customers announcing a new product line – must comply with the law.
Mad Mimi almost doesn't look like an email newsletter app at first glance. Instead of prominent buttons for emails or automations, you'll see tabs for Promotions and Audience. Those Promotions are your emails—only here, they're focused on making emails to share your sales, events, coupons, new products, and other company events and promotions with potential customers.
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