Potential Customers: Customers who haven’t bought your product or service (yet) but may buy in the future, fall into this category. These are prospects who you can email educative content that helps them understand your brand, product, or service better. You can even email them content that helps them see the brighter side of your market or current trends better.
Only send email if you have something to say. This one seems obvious, but too many companies start email newsletters with no plan and nothing to say. Email is simply a way to publish content—the content itself has to come first. Before starting a newsletter, make sure it's a sustainable commitment that will help you achieve your business goals. Otherwise, you'll be wasting your subscribers' time and your own time. Ask yourself: What's the goal for this kind of communication? What do we have to say? How will we measure success? Send thoughtful newsletters, and keep the focus on your company's message.

You can add more detail to your emails with GetResponse, as well. It can import images from Flickr, Facebook, and iStock, sell products in emails with PayPal buttons, and even reuse text from previous emails with its snippets feature. Then, you can schedule your emails in advance by dragging them to the correct date on a calendar. And if you're promoting your products online, GetResponse has you covered with tools to import contacts from Facebook forms and Twitter ads.
The first thing to understand about new customers is that they’re in a precarious position. They trust you enough to buy something once, but they’ve probably had bad purchasing experiences before and, subconsciously, they’re afraid you might be another company that fails to deliver. If you do come up short, it’s unlikely they’ll buy from you again.

In terms of relationship building, email marketing done well can be extremely successful. Whether it’s a monthly newsletter that comprises targeted information to nurture leads or a blog post, emails can provide an online resource for recipients, positioning a small business as an expert in the field through the posting of regular, insightful and relevant emails.
Rewarding customers for past purchases, sharing sale information, or encouraging customers to tell their friends about your brand are a few of the things you can do with a segmented list. Or you can categorize customers based on their email behavior (who opened/didn’t open an email). Then, you can target each list differently, either educating them further on your business, or incentivizing them to buy with a unique offer.

There are providers who try to sell you such lists and, in some cases, they even have opt-in proof which would hold up in a court of law. However, most email services we know of won’t let you use those kinds of lists. They don’t want to risk their good sender reputation, so they prohibit the use of purchased mailing lists. Statistics clearly show that the number of complaints is higher than the number of successful clicks for such lists.
Every year, InfoUSA deploys an average of 25 billion emails for thousands of businesses across the country. We also invest over $20 million every year to having the most up-to-date data possible. We employ over 300 full-time researchers to ensure our business and consumer records are current. We then make 24 million calls each year to gather and verify valuable business information.
Presentation is everything, or so they say. With this old adage in mind, we’ve compiled our best tips for anyone who wants to send emails that subscribers click into a handy email design guide. We cover each facet of design: content, templates, identity, color, images, layout, fonts, and calls to action. Design is as much science as it is art, and we take the guesswork out of what can seem like the most challenging part of sending good emails.
Gathering customer feedback via email works well for a few reasons. Your subscribers have already given you permission to contact them, which means they’re naturally more engaged than the broad audience you’d reach by publishing your survey on your website – and they’re more likely to have a vested interest in whatever you do with this information.
In terms of relationship building, email marketing done well can be extremely successful. Whether it’s a monthly newsletter that comprises targeted information to nurture leads or a blog post, emails can provide an online resource for recipients, positioning a small business as an expert in the field through the posting of regular, insightful and relevant emails. 
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