Email's important, but so is social and mobile—if anything, the two together are the new email. After all, your phone's always with you, and while you might ignore your email, you're unlikely to turn off your SMS notifications. So Mailigen lets you combine them all, so you can target your audience wherever they're most likely to check their messages.
If you pay on a yearly basis you’ll receive wide discounts across the board. There’s also a 14-day free trial that allows you to test the service for up to 100 contacts and 100 emails sent. However, they are lenient with the timeframe and you might be able to get an extension. Since there are no refunds you’ll definitely want to try the software before you buy.

But there's a happy medium if you'd like more control. You can host your own email app, and then use a transactional email sending service—including Amazon SES, Mailchimp's Mandrill, SendGrid, and Mailgun—to send your messages. That gives you the flexibility of an app that you control, the cost savings of bulk email sending, and the confidence of sending emails with a dedicated service that delivers your messages to any email app, anywhere.
If you've already tried another email newsletter app and want something different, you'll want to be able to move your lists and not have to start over from scratch. Sendloop lets you do just that with its migration assistant to import contacts from a number of email services or even a zip file. It can also import HTML email template you're already using.
In short, an email newsletter may require more work in its creation than a direct sales email would and still result in fewer direct sales. However, email newsletters build customer loyalty and ultimately drive sales both in the short and long term. When considering the pros and cons of an email newsletter, consider your in-house content resources as well as your need to drive immediate revenue from a newsletter via email.
Tell recipients how to opt out of receiving future email from you. Your message must include a clear and conspicuous explanation of how the recipient can opt out of getting email from you in the future. Craft the notice in a way that’s easy for an ordinary person to recognize, read, and understand. Creative use of type size, color, and location can improve clarity. Give a return email address or another easy Internet-based way to allow people to communicate their choice to you. You may create a menu to allow a recipient to opt out of certain types of messages, but you must include the option to stop all commercial messages from you. Make sure your spam filter doesn’t block these opt-out requests.
Send people content they want. Email newsletter services offer features like groups and segmentation to help you make your content relevant to the people reading it. If you're sending different emails for different groups (for example, a nonprofit might send separate emails to volunteers, donors, and the board of directors), then you can ask people to check a box to join a particular group on your signup form. Segmentation allows you to target certain subscribers on your list without assigning them to group. If your store is having a sale, then you could send a campaign only to people near a particular zip code, because subscribers who live in other parts of the world don't need to know about it. You can also segment by activity, email clients, e-commerce data, and more. Sending relevant content will keep your readers engaged, and engaged readers look forward to your newsletter and share it with friends.
Carl: Right, and so they’re giving you this information one step at a time to make sure you as a customer have time to process it and digest it. That’s much more user-friendly than just sending you like, “Here’s our startup guide”, in this like 30-page PDF. Right? So that’s the goal behind this email series that they have. Sometimes you’ll have companies who’s goal is to sell.
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