For example, retail email senders are often heavily focused on products so their newsletters will typically include a lot of product-focused content. But the amount of “product” in your newsletter will vary depending on your industry. Health and wellness companies, on the other hand, can focus on the “benefits” or lifestyles of the recipients more and provide related content that keeps exercise (the product in this instance) top of mind for recipients.
Carl: They’re most likely to open a new emails when they just sign up, versus a month from now, versus a year from now. You’ll see this tail basically, your email rate tailing off in terms of open rates and click rates, and that is expected. So as a marketer, if you see that, don’t freak out. It doesn’t mean that your second or third email are really bad. It’s just a normal user behavior that you’ll see throughout your campaigns.
What they should improve: It's probably more of a feature than a bug but definitely one of the things I don't find ideal – you're completely dependent on Amazon SES. Because of that, the setup process takes a lot longer than for other newsletter tools. You have to register for two different services and Amazon requests a lot of information from you.

It’s also important to look at what content has already done well for you. As this content will make a great addition to your newsletter. Amber Ooley from Thrive Internet Marketing Agency says, “I pull the top-performing blog posts and other content from the last week based on Google Analytics, website engagement, and social media shares. Then, I’ll craft it all into a consistent email template”.
Why It’s Important: According to Hannah Stacey, writing for Ometria, “It’s easy to fall into the trap of thinking that effective e-commerce marketing ends with a customer buying something. The problem with this way of thinking is that it fails to take into account one major caveat: that retaining a customer is far more valuable in the long-run than acquiring a new one. And when you start focusing on retention, a customer making a purchase actually marks the beginning of the process, not the end.”
For instance, I like getting the New York Times cooking recipes. My partner Steve enjoys getting updates on the latest shows added to Netflix. I would never want an email from Netflix telling me anything, instant unsubscribe! Does this mean Netflix doesn’t benefit from its email marketing? Of course not. I am not someone who enjoys their emails so their email content isn’t really for me. It also doesn't affect my use or enjoyment of their service so let’s dispel the fear that if someone doesn’t enjoy your email content they will not use your service. So whether you prefer Seth Godin’s marketing emails or Marie Forleo’s weekly videos, the point is that marketing emails are all about what you have to offer that your ideal customers want and need. Not what everyone wants.
Remember the limitations of customer surveys. Customers may not know how they’d really respond to hypothetical prompts (such as, “How much would you pay for a product with [xx] feature?”), while relying too closely on survey data prevents you from understanding the nuance behind customer responses. Pair survey data with in-person feedback gathering, if possible.
If you offered subscribers a coupon in exchange for their email address, make sure you set up your email automation to actually send the coupon code in the email. Create an obvious CTA that takes users directly to your website to redeem the coupon. If you offered a PDF or something else in exchange for an email, make sure it’s included in the first one.
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