Marketing emails need to be personalized to the reader and filled with interesting graphics. Few people want to read emails that are addressed "Dear Sir/Madam" -- as opposed to their first or last name -- and even fewer people want to read an email that simply gives them a wall of text. Visuals help your recipients quickly understand what the point of the email is.
Finding the right partner for your company's email marketing efforts can be a critical element in your long-term success. At Infogroup Media Solutions, we provide email marketing services that deliver prospective customers and help you reach them more effectively with cost-efficient marketing tools. We bring solutions that integrate your existing branding strategies and boost your company's visibility in the online community.
When you're ready to send an email to your list, it's as easy as sending a reply in Outlook or Gmail. Sendloop's editor show your From address and Subject line at the top, lets you pick your subscriber list in the To field, then type in your email with rich or plain text. If you need to edit photos, there's a built-in Creative Cloud-powered editor for simple Photoshop tools in your browser.
Handyman Connection’s Derek Christian explains, “The most important element is the subject line of the email. We look for a compelling idea that can be communicated in less than 60 characters. The topic drives the rest of the newsletter. That idea is what the entire thing is designed around. We start with the copy for the subject then we work back from there”.
To ensure your email doesn’t get flagged as SPAM or junk by readers, consider implementing a permission-based approach. Permission marketing is essentially when a recipients have provided explicit consent that they want to receive your email communications – whether by sign-up or other opt-in mechanism. There are a number of things you can do to build an organic, opt-in marketing list. Read about these in my earlier blogs:
Maybe there is someone out there that still likes getting monthly or weekly emails in their inbox with subject lines like “August newsletter: update of company events at blah blah Inc.” However, for most of us the word “newsletter” has become unattractive; devoid of meaning and therefore any value. We don't like the newsletters we receive nor do we get anything out of them so we resist creating our own email marketing campaigns in fear of being that meaningless content dribbling into others inboxes that we dislike so much ourselves.
Likewise, there are also companies who sell "Email Marketing" or supposed opt-in email for much less than we do. All these companies are doing is SPAMMING people with your offer. These are the companies you see online selling millions of emails for $xxx. This is far less than what we even pay websites for co-registration data. Using these types of companies to email for you  will inevitably cause you major problems with your web hosting company and in fact can get your website shut down.
Potential Customers: Customers who haven’t bought your product or service (yet) but may buy in the future, fall into this category. These are prospects who you can email educative content that helps them understand your brand, product, or service better. You can even email them content that helps them see the brighter side of your market or current trends better.
Every subscriber on your list is different, with different needs. So the last thing you want to do is take the one size fits all approach. Think about it, will it be appropriate to send a promotional email to men, when it actually appeals to women? Of course not. There’s little to no chance that every subscriber will be interested in the different types of products you sell.
For instance, I like getting the New York Times cooking recipes. My partner Steve enjoys getting updates on the latest shows added to Netflix. I would never want an email from Netflix telling me anything, instant unsubscribe! Does this mean Netflix doesn’t benefit from its email marketing? Of course not. I am not someone who enjoys their emails so their email content isn’t really for me. It also doesn't affect my use or enjoyment of their service so let’s dispel the fear that if someone doesn’t enjoy your email content they will not use your service. So whether you prefer Seth Godin’s marketing emails or Marie Forleo’s weekly videos, the point is that marketing emails are all about what you have to offer that your ideal customers want and need. Not what everyone wants.
Opt-in email: Opt-in email is any commercial email sent to people who have specifically signed up to receive it. Permission, in this respect, is clear-cut. If you have a list based on people who have signed up to receive emails about travel in general but not your travel agency, it doesn't qualify as specific permission. If you have a list of people who have agreed, in some form of writing, link clicking or other evidence, that they want to receive emails from your travel agency specifically, you fall well within the bounds of opt-in.
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Despite its name, the CAN-SPAM Act doesn’t apply just to bulk email. It covers all commercial messages, which the law defines as “any electronic mail message the primary purpose of which is the commercial advertisement or promotion of a commercial product or service,” including email that promotes content on commercial websites. The law makes no exception for business-to-business email. That means all email – for example, a message to former customers announcing a new product line – must comply with the law.
Carl: Right. And then the other big pros and cons to the two is that, imagine you’re the marketer at MailChimp. You and your team go ahead and create this beautiful email drip. Once you’ve created this drip series, you can basically send it and forget it — in the sense that subscribers that join your list or become customers in a month from now, three months from now, or maybe even a year from now will still get this very viable email drip.
One of the most common questions that people who are new to email marketing typically have is whether their email marketing program should feature a newsletter or a direct sales email … or even a hybrid of both. Of course, the most effective email marketing programs will contain a combination of both types of emails. However, it's also important to take the time to think through what the difference between an email newsletter and a direct sales email is. With the information that you gained in the previous chapter about the different types of email marketing, their users and the types of information contained in them, you'll then be able to read this section and begin to visualize what your email marketing program should look like.
Professional, cloud-based email marketing platforms like GetResponse offer plans based on the size of your email marketing list (number of contacts.) Basic plans start as low as $15 monthly, and provide features like email marketing, autoresponders, marketing automation, and landing pages – everything you need to start growing your business. But before committing, you can always try a free plan, and make sure it’s a good fit.
Be sure to look at the tech support offered by each of these companies, as we felt many weren't as available as we would have liked. You'll find that some offer 24/7 phone support, live chat, and email help, while others leave you to rely on online documentation and limited live support hours. The best services offer a combination of self-serve help resources—where you can search FAQs and articles to find your own answers—as well as live support via chat or phone when you can't solve an issue yourself. We cover all of these concerns in our reviews, plus you can get an overview in the feature chart above.
Targeting doesn’t just apply to location or age. One of its key benefits is your ability to target those at different stages of the buying cycle with the content that is most relevant to them. At its core, the buying cycle has three phases – interest, research and purchase. Say you sent an email to someone at the ‘interest’ stage that invited them to visit your website for a quote. This could look like a hard sales tactic and really put them off your brand.
It starts with email newsletters, with a full-featured email editor to design email newsletters and send them to your lists. That's the core focus of the base plan, where you can start building your contact lists around your newsletters. Then as your marketing grows, you can upgrade to a Plus plan with CRM and marketing automation features to store more details about contacts and use that to focus your lists and land more sales.
Whatever form your newsletter takes, know it’s just one of many touchpoints. But it’s the most direct way to speak to the people who may be your clients someday consistently with no marginal cost. Focus on delivering value to them—even if there’s only 10 of them at first. For most service businesses just two or three new clients for the year is such a big payoff that nurturing a small list of interested subscribers thoughtfully is completely worth it. However, if you sell low cost products then quantity is important and building a huge list would be your goal.    
Designing emails with MailChimp is easy at every level. For beginners with little-to-no design experience, MailChimp offers elegant and versatile templates that can be customized with a drag-and-drop editor, guaranteeing that you’ll find a preset layout or theme to fit your vision. If you’ve already designed the email you want to send or have an in-house developer, MailChimp also allows you to paste in custom code or import HTML and zip files. For those users who are somewhere in between, all of MailChimp’s templates can be personalized by adding bits of custom HTML into the existing themes — it even includes links to an article on HTML email basics with best practices for design and development.
Potential Customers: Customers who haven’t bought your product or service (yet) but may buy in the future, fall into this category. These are prospects who you can email educative content that helps them understand your brand, product, or service better. You can even email them content that helps them see the brighter side of your market or current trends better.
Uber’s email campaign is very simple, yet tasteful. We love how Uber gets straight to the point in their newsletters. The text is usually very brief with a clear CTA, which is perfect for subscribers who don’t have a lot of time and just skim the message. For those who want to learn more, there is always a link you can follow. Uber always send different promotions and provides an amazing map of your rides, with a detailed map of your journey.
Best are the extra apps and tools that come along with MailChimp. MailChimp's mobile apps let you send emails, and check your stats, and add new contacts to your lists on the go. You'll also come to love its smarts that'll automatically find the best time to send your emails based on its data from everyone else's campaigns or your subscribers' time zones, automations that let you send emails based on your audience segments, a customizable form and landing page builder to gather subscribers, and new Mandrill-powered drip tools to send transactional emails from the same app.

Thanks Kelly, Mailchimp have definitely come a long way with their UI over the years, it’s just their service that hasn’t caught up ;) I haven’t had the chance to play around with Pure360 as much as I’d like, but I’ve heard the same things echoed by several friends who use their service. Looking at their client list, I think they’re more aimed at large companies though.
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