To put these numbers into context: a myriad of data compiled on Twitter shows that the average click-through rate rarely tops 1.64 percent. Without paying for promotion, the average Facebook post is even worse. This is compared to email open rates, which hover around ~20% for many industries and can go up to as high as 40, 50, and 60 percent (and beyond!).
For effective and actionable results, you should do A/B tests, which test two (or more) different approaches. For example, you could send half of your list one subject line, and an alternate subject line to the other half. You could also A/B test the two approaches with a small subset of your list, then send the winning headline to the rest of the list.
I think the object of this part is to create a list of people's emails so that you might have a database of people to sell things to. The easiest way to create this email list is to offer them something free. That way people will be willing to sign up for your free whatever it is that you want to give them. Once you create a little form for them to put their name and email into, then you give them the free thing. It could be something they download, or it could be something tangible, such as something physical you send in the mail. It would be more expensive to do that, but the way you get around that is to do a raffle. If you offer something really good, something that costs money, like a gem or a ring or something similar, you could raffle it and still, people would be willing to give you their email just for the act of getting in on the opportunity to win the ring or the gem or whatever it is you would like to raffle. It could be a "Fidget Spinner." It could be anything.
Every ESP will give you tools to create an opt-in form for your site. Generally speaking, the less information you ask for (at this initial stage, at least), the better. The more information you ask for, the less likely your prospect is to complete the process. You’ll obviously need to ask for an email address, and I also highly recommended that you ask for a first name so you can personalize your emails. However, asking for any information beyond these two fields can decrease conversion rates significantly without adding much valuable data.
Offer a reward for customers who buy something from you and show that they checked in at your business on Foursquare using their mobile device. When they do this, they’re telling everyone in their network that they’ve done business with you. Each month, reward the person who gave you the greatest exposure by offering a discount, and asking for their email address.
The more you guest post, the easier it will be to get your content in front of other people.  That’s because you will be able to build relationships with the editors, but you’ll also be able to use your past work as evidence that you’re a good writer. Though you don’t have to set it as a goal, getting published on a major industry blog can make it easier to get your content published on other sites.
One often overlooked strategy for list building is to step outside of your immediate market, and get known in new verticals. Take for example, my list building advice: it works for bloggers, but it can also work for photographers, dentists, and jewelry designers. I’ve been able to repurpose my content and do short focused bursts of list building in these different markets.
A suggestion? Include a newsletter opt-in check box directly on your retargeting message or if you are capturing sales leads, be sure to remind your sales team to ask the prospect if they wish to sign up to the company newsletter before adding them to your organisation’s marketing list. Last but not least, always remember to have your data privacy link readily available on your main website.
Now that you’re all set up to starting collecting emails, the fun part begins (when I say ‘fun’, I actually mean ‘hard’). If your site receives a good amount of traffic and you have a truly compelling offer, this shouldn’t be too difficult. However, if you’re like most business owners, you’ll need to look outside your own audience to start building your list.
Well, once your guest post is accepted on a site, you’ll often have the chance to create something known as an ‘author bio.’  In this section, you can mention that you have some complementary content available. This is often known as a ‘content upgrade.’  If the content you’re giving away is highly related to the blog post, you’re going to increase the odds of conversion rates being high.
Give it a try. Every optin list provider gives a set of code to paste into your website. You can paste it anywhere you like. I put it on my contact page and on the end of most posts. They call the code a trip wire because you can scatter the code throughout your website to encourage people to sign in. When using visual editing I usually type 3 *** where I want to insert the code. Then I go to text edit find and remove the *** and replace it with the sign in code.
Your tip about CTA’s really hit the spot. I’ve been noticing that some of our competitors are using wordy yet highly specific buttons like ‘Get My Free Consultation Now!’ or ‘See Other Works From ____’. I was skeptic at first, but reading your logic behind it, it makes sense. I’m looking forward to implementing this on my own sites. Thank you, Brian.
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