HI Crispian... never worry about how long it takes you.. .you will find that you gel with some things instantly and other aspects of marketing really fox you. The important thing is not to give up and keep travelling forward. Remember the road to success is in zig zags never straight lines and I have so much respect for anyone trying to learn new things. There is such alot to learn in the beginning.. you almost have to learn a new language too - all the marketing lingo.. but if you stick with it, it doesn't take that long. Think of this as setting up a new business. If you went to university you would expect a course to take 5 years... so give yourself a break and don't worry about how long it takes... know one thing.. if you spent everyday for 5 years learning marketing, then you would have skills that would serve you for life! I think the mistake I made was thinking this could all be learnt in 5 minutes... I started in Feb 2013 and it is only now I am really seeing the birdseye view and feeling comfy with all the jargon. So now for me personally its time to get actually moving and take action... this is not a 5 minute game. This is a business opportunity and we will all give ourselves a much better chance of success if we actually understood that this really can be a key to financial success and time freedom... and with those things you can then help anybody or do anything :) best of luck
It’s extremely affordable (starting at $15/month), while incredibly powerful and easy to use. I also find that GetResponse have some of the best newsletter template designs around. Aweber is another good call, but I find their user interface a bit outdated and clunky (plus, their pricing starts at $19/month – not a big deal, but considering they’re not quite as good as GetResponse IMO this pushes the needle in favour of GetResponse even more).

Similar to the process of advertising to build your email list on other websites, using search marketing to build email list can be equally effective. Build email landing pages specific to your email list and then optimize for organic search engine placement or paid, click-based search engine advertising. Again, however, if you do this, be sure that you have a handle on how much you can afford to pay per email sign-up as well as a way to track where email sign-ups came from. If you're not well versed in the marketing areas of search engine optimization or search engine marketing, you may want to consider hiring a professional to help you since both of those areas can be complicated to learn. However, many successful email lists have been built using search engines as the primary method for recruiting subscribers.
Even if you haven’t collected subscriber information via an email sign up form (such as one on your website or blog), you can use information collected from your CRM or e-commerce platform to personalize your campaigns. For example, Salesforce might tell you which individuals live in a certain geographic area based on their billing address. You can then use this information to send emails that are tailored to a subscriber’s physical location, which is useful if you’re promoting an event in a particular city.
Mailchimp – This is the most affordable option on the market today and their email template design editor is quite feature rich. It also has a drag and drop interface. Their major downsides to Mailchimp is (a) they’re terrible, robotic customer support and (b) it feels like a lot more steps than are necessary to send a newsletter or to setup an autoresponder.
I think what Brian and the testers are missing is that 15k is neither big enough to be impressive nor small enough to be inviting. It’s not a number that works effectively as social proof, and while I can’t test it out myself, I believe, based on evidence for social proof around the web, that DIYthemes would have had much better success with a combined number in the 50k+ range as mentioned above.
Offline events like trade shows are highly anticipated growth opportunities for professionals in your industry. Demo your latest product at an appropriate conference and collect signups in-person. Once you're back at the office, import these signups into your contact database. Be sure to send these contacts a welcome email that confirms their opt-in to your list. (See #8 in this blog post for tips on sending welcome emails.)
Your best bet will be to give away something that’s valuable to your target market; for instance, a high-value digital asset on a niche topic. You can give away products (we’ve all seen contests where the prize is a free iPad or gift certificates), however this strategy often leads to entrants who are more interested in the money than in what you have to offer.
You could have an ad or post on Facebook, a pay-per-click ad, a banner ad, a video on YouTube…. Whatever it is, you’ll have a compelling message that, hopefully, convinces the prospect to click your link to get more information. It often helps to include a limited-time offer of some sort, to create urgency. You should include a link on whatever type of ad you use.
Just because your email list is an online marketing tool, it doesn't mean that you only have to solicit emails online! If you have a retail location, you can collect emails when customers purchase or visit the store or other location. If you market by attending festivals or concerts, you can collect emails at those locations. Offering to raffle off a prize but requiring an email on the raffle ticket can also be an effective way to grow your email list. Of course, you'll have to dedicate the time to retyping all of the emails that you collect into your system, but it's often worth it. Don't overlook offline opportunities to grow your email list.

You can use this strategy to your advantage and increase your email list by giving people an incentive in return for their email. The giveaway could be free access to an e-book, a report, a gift hamper, or perhaps a lucky draw where people enter their emails and get a chance to win. A tantalizing offer is all you need for people to comply. For example:
Offer a reward for customers who buy something from you and show that they checked in at your business on Foursquare using their mobile device. When they do this, they’re telling everyone in their network that they’ve done business with you. Each month, reward the person who gave you the greatest exposure by offering a discount, and asking for their email address.

Groups are specialized list fields that correspond to fields on your signup forms. They let you ask your contacts to self-categorize with preset responses that you provide. For example, a garden shop might ask their contacts what best describes them: a gardener, landscaper, or indoor plant enthusiast. After contacts self-select their interests, you can create internal tags based on group data, or send email campaigns to a segment containing one group, a few groups, or all of them.
Give it a try. Every optin list provider gives a set of code to paste into your website. You can paste it anywhere you like. I put it on my contact page and on the end of most posts. They call the code a trip wire because you can scatter the code throughout your website to encourage people to sign in. When using visual editing I usually type 3 *** where I want to insert the code. Then I go to text edit find and remove the *** and replace it with the sign in code.
great info...... This is all very useful. I am so glad that I found this site. I am getting so happy about all this. My next thing is to make a squeeze page.I do have a question though. When I am making my pg does the free product that I am promoting to get the email of people have to do with the product that I am going to be using the mailing list to promote? Thank you very much.

Sponsor a video contest in which customers create a one-minute video about why they like your business, products or services. Ask them to send the videos to you and post them to your Facebook page. Invite visitors to vote on which video should win a cash or merchandise prize. Include an email opt-in on your Facebook page. Be sure to follow Facebook’s rules regarding contests.
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