To put these numbers into context: a myriad of data compiled on Twitter shows that the average click-through rate rarely tops 1.64 percent. Without paying for promotion, the average Facebook post is even worse. This is compared to email open rates, which hover around ~20% for many industries and can go up to as high as 40, 50, and 60 percent (and beyond!).
Video is a huge player when it comes to traffic. Videos provide content in a really similar way that articles do. Creating video content is not hard, and I'm going to show you how to create compelling videos so that you can actually drive traffic to your squeeze pages. The good thing about videos is that it filters the traffic that's going on to your sites so that all of the visitors have been previously targeted.
Get creative. Since every business is different, some of the strategies in this guide might not work for your business if you implement them exactly as described. However, most of what’s described can work for a large majority of businesses with just a few tweaks. In some cases, you might even get greater results than the people who wrote these posts.
One way you can do this is by heading over to Buzzsumo again and searching a keyword based on your niche.  You’ll want to find content that is popular in your niche and look for ways to make it better. Finding this kind of content can sometimes be hard, especially if you’re using broad keywords in certain niches. As a result, you’ll need to follow the tips that I provided earlier for combining the core keyword with something that relates to the ability to take action.

This is especially effective of course if the content you’re sharing is relevant to your own business, and if you’re sharing it to or with a group of your target audience. If you share highly relevant content on Facebook and your target audience clicks on it from your Snip.ly link, chances are they’ll also be interested in your content and opt-in offers. Use Snip.ly to add calls to action to all of the relevant content you share.


Many marketers have “send fear” when it comes to emai marketing. They know that screwing up recipient’s names or preferences can lead to turned off subscribers and list decay. And it’s true– if you don’t do personalization correctly, you can wind up sending irrelevant messages to subscribers. However, this fear is getting in the way of marketers’ success, and the best way to move forward is to experiment with personalization. Start small, testing a few changes, and grow your strategy as you get more comfortable.
Mailchimp – This is the most affordable option on the market today and their email template design editor is quite feature rich. It also has a drag and drop interface. Their major downsides to Mailchimp is (a) they’re terrible, robotic customer support and (b) it feels like a lot more steps than are necessary to send a newsletter or to setup an autoresponder.
Some ad platforms will ask more of your landing pages than others, when running ads. For example, AdWords is much stricter, when compared to Facebook. AdWords typically requires that you do not have a ‘thin,’ site that is designed solely to collect leads.  Because of this it might be a good idea to focus on using Facebook or Twitter, to begin with.
Saber Blast – This is the simple and intuitive email marketing software I created after I got tired of using Aweber and Mailchimp. Most people don’t know about it since it’s still new but if you’re on the market for an email marketing solution, this offers a lot of valuable features that the competition doesn’t. For instance, Saber Blast helps you increase the number of email subscribers you capture, provides automated follow-up (easy to manage autoresponder) and recommendations on who is and isn’t a lead from your email list based on their engagement levels. At it’s core, it’s designed to grow your business. It has minimal features when it comes to the design of your newsletter since we believe that’s actually a distraction from taking the revenue-growing action of creating great content to quickly and painlessly send to subscribers.
Traffic for list building is a topic that has really frustrated me at the hands of the so-called Internet Marketing gurus. I have heard so many ideas and implemented a mishmash of them. Maybe I should go back to all my notebooks and try to condense everything that has been said and try to distill my own strategic framework out of it all. These are some of the things that stick in my mind:
Unfortunately, there’s a bit too much depth to the topic for me to cram everything in to a single blog post. Therefore, I’m going to begin creating a multi-part blog series on list building. Over the next couple days, I’m going to purely focus on teaching some tricks of the trade to build a list quickly (these have now all been merged into this single post).
To get started, find the top 5 -10 content pages on your website and create a custom Content Upgrade for each post. Once that’s done you can continue on down the list until you have a Content Upgrade for every page on your site that receives a good amount of traffic each month (note: ‘good’ is in context of your website, your traffic and your business – for some businesses it’s 100 visits per month on a content page, for others it’s 1,000).
I’ll never forget the fun we had at those NFL celebrations at Regent Street in London, a couple of years back. My sister and I took part in a couple of games, one of which required yelling some American Football words at the top of our voices, and our mum was certain we were going to nail this. Sure this sounds supportive, but our mum’s focus was on “yelling”. Joke’s on her, we failed miserably (…we only caught “quarterback” out of all the words).
There are tons of websites and publishers out there that cater to your audience -- and larger portions of it. Guest blogging for these websites helps you expand your contact list to this audience. When creating content as a guest blogger for another website, include a call-to-action, as well as a link in you author byline, for readers to subscribe to your site's blog or email newsletter.
Growing your email list can be quite similar to advertising your business as a whole. Websites that have similar content or user demographics to your website can be great places to prospect for potential email list leads. You can do this in a number of ways. Ideally, you can cut a deal with the website on which you want to collect emails to promise them advertising space in any email that you send. This will save you from having to pay to advertise for your email list. You can also pay to advertise for sign-ups to your email list on other websites. You can do this by purchasing an impression-based or click-based advertising campaign, or you can offer to pay per valid email sign-up. Both are acceptable industry standard ways to pay for email advertising. However, if you are going to pay to advertise your email list and recruit email sign-ups on another website, you'll need to ensure that you have a firm understanding of what you can afford to spend per email sign-up is. To do this, you'll have to assign a value to an email name. The best way to do this is to keep it simple. Take a look at your last email send. If you had an email list of one hundred people and your email generated $100 in revenue, then you can spend $1 per email sign-up.
Include an opt-in field (i.e. checkbox) within your landing page forms to opt users into your list. This gives visibility to your email offerings and provides a value add to customers who have already engaged with your product. It’s important not to pre-check the box (see pre-selected opt-in below)–instead allow potential subscribers to choose whether or not to opt in.
Great article. Thank you. I’ve just started a blog and eZine. Swapping services with another company is one of the first things on my list. They are plugging my work in their newsletter, and linking on the basis that we co-refer through our emailings. We are in the same general market but our niches complement rather than compete. The reason they agreed was because they like having extra content for their list.
Aweber seems quite expensive comparatively speaking, especially to those who are just starting out as beginners. From what i have read and the general impression that I get from the many members in the community, is that not everyone is so fortunate and able to afford an Autoresponder such as Aweber. There are the lesser expensive ones and then there are the free ones. I have an interest in one paricular free Autoresponder named Listwire. From the reviews that I have read, Listwire comes up trumps and its pretty reiable.. Can I suggest that for us beginners, rather to start with something like Listwire and once you get the hang of things, to then invest in a paid Autoresponder? Will appreciate feedbacks. Thanks.

Providing quality content that will genuinely HELP the reader is a very important aspect of building a relationship with your list. Don't be pushy about the promotion of your products. Sending out quality content within your emails will entice the members of your mailing list to open your mail-outs on a continual basis and actually read your emails. When they read, and like the content, they'll read again, and again. You want to build "TRUST" between you and your members, so don't bombard them with too much of a sales pitch!


Tip: Align the timing of your pop-up form with the average amount of time a visitor spends on your website. Set the form to appear immediately (or with a 5-second delay) if people aren’t inclined to spend much time on your site. If visitors have a tendency to browse, consider a 20-second delay or a scroll-based trigger when someone reaches the middle or bottom of your page.

It’s a best practice to ask the referrer not only for a friend’s email address, but also for a full name so that the message is personalized. Most important, remember to add the referee’s full name to the email as well. By referencing whom the email content was recommended by, you gain instant credibility and will attain much higher conversion rates.
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