The live video option on Facebook, for example, can be increasingly used to your advantage, where you can connect with so many people at the same time. While you are at it, you can create a live contest too, through your live video, and get your audience on your email list by asking them to participate by leaving their email in the comment section.
In this video Sean Cannell from Think Media shares 5 tips on how to use YouTube to generate leads. If you are curious about how to build an email list or how to build an email list fast. Is it possible to build a email list for free? Sean says "yes," and in this video you'll learn how how to build an email list from scratch. People often wonder how to build a large email list and audience from scratch so they research email list building and email list building strategies. So check out this email list building tutorial and these email list building tips and strategic list building strategies!
Once you have a topic for content creation, you then need to think about producing it. What you want to do, is create something that’s better than what’s available. As I mentioned before, this can mean that you make the existing content more actionable.  It can also relate to creating content that has a better design.  It may even be just that you add more images, because content with more images tends to get 94% more views than content without images.  Creating something with a lot of words also helps, because if a post is longer than 1,500 words it tends to rank higher in the search engines.
Getting your messages to your customers’ inboxes should be your main goal for any email marketing campaign. According to ReturnPath’s 2016 Deliverability Benchmark Report, 21% of email routinely goes undelivered, so you can’t afford for email acquisition practices to negatively affect your deliverability. To help you achieve your goal, there are a few best practices you should follow to keep a clean subscriber list.
When they click on the link, they are taken to a landing page that has strong copy that reveals the biggest benefits of your product or service. Show the prospect how their life will change. You want this landing page, also called a signup page or squeeze page, to be short and to the point. (It is possible, of course, to just send them to your main website. But it could be distracting with all the links and different pages.
I would agree with that statement and here’s why you should too. According to research from the Direct Marketing Association (DMA) email returns $40 for every $1 spend on average. In addition, the same study found that email marketing has a buy rate 1000% higher than social media (such as Facebook and Twitter), and double that of organic search engine marketing (SEO).

I think the object of this part is to create a list of people's emails so that you might have a database of people to sell things to. The easiest way to create this email list is to offer them something free. That way people will be willing to sign up for your free whatever it is that you want to give them. Once you create a little form for them to put their name and email into, then you give them the free thing. It could be something they download, or it could be something tangible, such as something physical you send in the mail. It would be more expensive to do that, but the way you get around that is to do a raffle. If you offer something really good, something that costs money, like a gem or a ring or something similar, you could raffle it and still, people would be willing to give you their email just for the act of getting in on the opportunity to win the ring or the gem or whatever it is you would like to raffle. It could be a "Fidget Spinner." It could be anything.
It’s a best practice to ask the referrer not only for a friend’s email address, but also for a full name so that the message is personalized. Most important, remember to add the referee’s full name to the email as well. By referencing whom the email content was recommended by, you gain instant credibility and will attain much higher conversion rates.

Give it a try. Every optin list provider gives a set of code to paste into your website. You can paste it anywhere you like. I put it on my contact page and on the end of most posts. They call the code a trip wire because you can scatter the code throughout your website to encourage people to sign in. When using visual editing I usually type 3 *** where I want to insert the code. Then I go to text edit find and remove the *** and replace it with the sign in code.
Use a reactivation campaign to gauge whether non-responsive subscribers are still reading (just not clicking through or tracking open rates), or if they’ve truly decided to opt out. An example from MarketingProfs is shown here. The language you choose can play a big role in how successful these campaigns are, so be sure to split-test a few versions to maximize response.
Social media is becoming an increasingly prominent form of customer retention and brand awareness. With the right motivation and a properly designed email sign-up box, social media leads can often be solicited to become higher converting email marketing leads. When we discuss the best practices for designing an email capture box, we'll discuss specific practices to use when encouraging users to sign-up for your email marketing program via social media outlets.
Providing quality content that will genuinely HELP the reader is a very important aspect of building a relationship with your list. Don't be pushy about the promotion of your products. Sending out quality content within your emails will entice the members of your mailing list to open your mail-outs on a continual basis and actually read your emails. When they read, and like the content, they'll read again, and again. You want to build "TRUST" between you and your members, so don't bombard them with too much of a sales pitch!
Every ESP will give you tools to create an opt-in form for your site. Generally speaking, the less information you ask for (at this initial stage, at least), the better. The more information you ask for, the less likely your prospect is to complete the process. You’ll obviously need to ask for an email address, and I also highly recommended that you ask for a first name so you can personalize your emails. However, asking for any information beyond these two fields can decrease conversion rates significantly without adding much valuable data.
Mailchimp – This is the most affordable option on the market today and their email template design editor is quite feature rich. It also has a drag and drop interface. Their major downsides to Mailchimp is (a) they’re terrible, robotic customer support and (b) it feels like a lot more steps than are necessary to send a newsletter or to setup an autoresponder.
Fewer people on the list will buy the “expensive” products. But the idea is that, through your name collection/lead generation (often shortened to lead gen) efforts, you will be constantly bringing new names on to your list. Out of those, a certain percentage will buy. A smaller percentage will buy higher priced products. And the smallest percentage will buy your most expensive offerings. Think of them like the “whales” in a casino. You want to cultivate your back-end buyers by offering good products and great customer service. They’re VIPs.
When a single step, like entering an email address into a collection field or selecting a checkbox, is taken to subscribe to an email marketing list. This practice is considered dangerous for a sender because nothing is preventing typos or forged email addresses from being added to your subscriber lists. With a single opt-in, there could be risks to your email delivery and reputation due to both a high number of bounced addresses and from blacklistings due to high spam traps.
Solo ads and Banner ads. One of the platforms I have been using for 3 years now, called LeadsLeap, combines solo ads and banner ads into a single platform. It is essentially an ads platform that includes a mailing element. They email a digest of ads to all members and progressively rotate ads through the mailing. They also provide tools for placing a LeadsLeap ads widget on websites. They present ads on their own website. Each one of my ads generates 10 or so clicks a day, day in and day out. Actively managed by testing new copy regularly will increase this rate. The platform also includes a 10 level deep downline for referrals from which one can earn commissions and ad credits. I have referred fewer than 20 people yet I have over 500 people in my downline.
It’s important to note that these systems make your job a whole lot easier through automation. The leads can sign up, be added to the list, start getting emails, even make sales… All while you sleep. With these systems, you can send the same email to thousands of people at the same time, automatically. You could potentially set up a schedule of emails going out for weeks or more at a time. You can even manually send emails if you want to run campaigns or send out messages on the fly.
When they click on the link, they are taken to a landing page that has strong copy that reveals the biggest benefits of your product or service. Show the prospect how their life will change. You want this landing page, also called a signup page or squeeze page, to be short and to the point. (It is possible, of course, to just send them to your main website. But it could be distracting with all the links and different pages.
Mailchimp – This is the most affordable option on the market today and their email template design editor is quite feature rich. It also has a drag and drop interface. Their major downsides to Mailchimp is (a) they’re terrible, robotic customer support and (b) it feels like a lot more steps than are necessary to send a newsletter or to setup an autoresponder.
Solo ads and Banner ads. One of the platforms I have been using for 3 years now, called LeadsLeap, combines solo ads and banner ads into a single platform. It is essentially an ads platform that includes a mailing element. They email a digest of ads to all members and progressively rotate ads through the mailing. They also provide tools for placing a LeadsLeap ads widget on websites. They present ads on their own website. Each one of my ads generates 10 or so clicks a day, day in and day out. Actively managed by testing new copy regularly will increase this rate. The platform also includes a 10 level deep downline for referrals from which one can earn commissions and ad credits. I have referred fewer than 20 people yet I have over 500 people in my downline.
What I will say is that opt-ins on your website and social media will be your friend. Supply traffic coming from Google, Facebook, and Twitter with offerings that they must sign up for. Use a free ebook, a checklist, a free podcast, or even an email course (which you can set up with your autoresponder service) to get them to subscribe to your list.
Brian , your every post is like a book, I always read your post and try to find a few questions to ask .. but to be honest your posts are that comprehensive that, I don’t find a question to ask because you left nothing unexplained ! I wonder how long you take to prepare a post like this, I probably would take a whole year ! 🙂 Good luck Brian. you are a magician of IM strategies.
I’ve tested the Welcome Mat and Smart Bar apps as well but they didn’t produce anywhere near the conversion rate of the List Builder and Scrollbox apps (note: that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t test them on your site… it’s just that they didn’t perform that well on our site with the setup we used so we removed them so not to distract the visitor too much while we figure out new ways to test them).
For the initial launch of our blog, we mainly leveraged our network to get the word out about our new site. Most of the traffic for our initial first post came from posting on our personal Facebook pages as well as some Facebook groups that were focused around marketing and entrepreneurship such as From Wantrapreneur to Entrepreneur (a private group for people who’ve taken the SumoMe Building $1,000 monthly business course). We also tweeted from our personal accounts to get the word out. Finally, Benji emailed an old list of his that had 164 people on it, and got a 13.5% click rate, so that also drove some traffic.
Great article. Thank you. I’ve just started a blog and eZine. Swapping services with another company is one of the first things on my list. They are plugging my work in their newsletter, and linking on the basis that we co-refer through our emailings. We are in the same general market but our niches complement rather than compete. The reason they agreed was because they like having extra content for their list.
I always pause and laugh when I see a CTA with a small, “No thanks, I don’t want to lose weight,” button underneath a prominent “Yes, sign me up!” link. It reminds me there’s a person behind the button, and, while it’s meant to be a joke, it also incentivizes me to hesitate before clicking “no, thanks”. It’s easy to click “no” when the CTA is “sign up for more emails!”, but it’s a little harder to say no to losing weight or getting richer.
To get people to sign-up in the first place, you need to grab their attention and make it worth their while to sign up. Many website offer "FREE" information or products to people who sign-up with their mailing lists. This technique will work if you offer the website visitors something that is of "value" to them. Value has to go hand-in-hand with promotional materials within your emails. No one wants to be bombarded with sales pitches every time they open an email from you, so don't bother even sending out such emails. The best way to promote your product is to provide information that relates to your product, then add a few sentences that make reference to your product and how it can help with the reader achieve something.
As Social Media has evolved, social media has become the free traffic home for the content one creates. What is really neat about Social Media is it is not that hard to profile the people you want to reach and to reach them. The platforms provide tools to make that easier and one can get away by just following what other people in a niche do. Follow them and craft better messages and better content than they do and you can grab (or leverage) their prospects.
Visitors to your website might overlook the call to sign up that you have at the top of every page, but it’s harder to ignore a lightbox or pop-up. Scroll boxes pop up on visitors’ screens after they’ve scrolled down a certain length of the page. The box encourages them to sign up for your email list. They can be effective for encouraging a user who’s already shown interest in your content (by staying on the page long enough to scroll) to sign up for your email list.
For instance, Geoff points out popups as potentially distracting elements on a website. He recommends their use on e-commerce sites, but less so on SaaS sites. He says, “You won’t see any pop-ups on our website. While we may miss out on some emails as a result, my argument is [that] this benefits our brand [and] our credibility, and keeps the bounce rate of our site visitors down.”

I am happy to also ask for a plug for my family’s apparel website in the opener of said post if you think this post suggestion is a good idea. Shameless I know…..LOL! But hey maybe it will get your fans to keep submitting ideas. There might be something here to channel your fan base to get us to help your business. Think it over…..You really have reached Malcolm Gladwell Tribe status. And have done a great job with that. At this point whatever you asked the tribe to do they would deliver for you.
If all Michael had was the 57k Facebook fans listed right below, I’m not nearly impressed. Combined with the big number above, however, the FB fan numbers serve as crucial verification. If your website has 1,500 FB likes, there is NO WAY I believe you have 500k viewers. But with Michael’s Facebook numbers, I start to believe in that much bigger number above, and it means I probably can’t afford to miss what he’s saying.
Figuring out when your visitor is ready to convert depends on your website viewers’ behavior, so you’ll want to conduct A/B testing to determine where you need to place your CTA. Does it work best towards the bottom of a blog page, when it slides out to the right, or does it get higher conversions at the beginning of the page, sliding out from the left?
Some ad platforms will ask more of your landing pages than others, when running ads. For example, AdWords is much stricter, when compared to Facebook. AdWords typically requires that you do not have a ‘thin,’ site that is designed solely to collect leads.  Because of this it might be a good idea to focus on using Facebook or Twitter, to begin with.
×