Brilliant! I know I probably shouldn’t be writing all just love what you’re saying here. But “love” what and “how” you are saying this here. I haven’t done the email thing yet, it’s something I’m ready to do and would benefit from too. But reading this today – found myself wanting to say, I would have wrote that – I want to copy and paste and tell others because you saved me the answer to myself being asked how do you do it Jane or errrrr zJayne!
How far along are you in the training? Affiliate marketing is all about connecting people with products and services they're searching for, but these don't have to be your products or your services. You can be an affiliate for amazon and connect people to any of the millions of products there. You don't have to buy the product first and then ship it, you simply connect people to the product. Amazon does the rest and pays you a commission for bringing them the customer. That's what this whole process is about. Kyle does a great job teaching you how to do this step by step. You don't have to deal with mailing lists if you don't want to. You're in the right place for this training!
How do you go about getting people to join yet another newsletter — let alone actually buy your stuff once they've signed up? At the end of the day, you need the right mix of incentives, signup forms and high quality, valuable content to send out. Let's take a look at how to put all these ingredients together so you can drive more signups and sales.

Unsubscribe rates track when you’ve finally lost permission for good. When someone unsubscribes from your list, it means they’ve gotten to the point where they’d like to formally revoke permission and never hear from you again. Marketers tend to focus on unsubscribe rates as the ultimate measure of when permission is lost. But the truth is, you probably lost permission far before your subscriber reached for that unsubscribe button.


Some ad platforms will ask more of your landing pages than others, when running ads. For example, AdWords is much stricter, when compared to Facebook. AdWords typically requires that you do not have a ‘thin,’ site that is designed solely to collect leads.  Because of this it might be a good idea to focus on using Facebook or Twitter, to begin with.
Integrations can help you marry data from your CRM with your email lists. Contrary to popular belief, you don’t need a developer to help you improve your lists. Automation and personalization are now totally accessible for the DIY marketer, and you don’t need to be using an enterprise-level tool to effectively do automation and personalization. Campaign Monitor integrates with CRMs such as Salesforce, Zapier, Sage, and many others. It also integrates with e-commerce platforms such as Magento, WooCommerce, Shopify, Eventbrite, and more.
Until recently the gurus stayed away from pushing paid traffic, maybe because they were wary of the horror stories. It is very clear that the easy days of cheap paid traffic are long gone. Cost per click is rising especially in popular niches. Paid traffic is also easy to get wrong. Quick Start Challenge view though is that paid traffic properly done delivers more consistent results especially when conditions change. The ad platforms always have a vested interest in keeping their ad revenues flowing. The same cannot be said on keeping your content presented on free platforms.
The best part of the platform is it has a free version which one can use to run your own ads with credits from reading and rating ads. The free way to start is to use the ads surfing as a way to learn how to write good ad copy (headline less than 25 characters plus a message less than 60 characters) and good landing pages. Just follow what the 5 star ad writers do and build that into your free credit ads – keep doing this over and over until you are ready to go Pro.  I use the paid Pro version at $19.95 a month which gives me 10 Pro ads which I can deploy without needing credits. Any credits I collect are applied to Credit ads that I run as well.
It used to be that marketers were set on building the largest email list possible, and many companies continue to boast about their “thousands” of subscribers. In order to stay competitive, marketers have tried tons of tactics to grow their lists, from pop-ups, to coaxing emails from lead gen assets, to running contests on social media that require an email address to sign up.

Brian. You talk about how all these variables matter in getting this article to rank #1 for “list building” and how competitors have way more links than you, but then you also consider your DA and your PA together, you have almost the highest score out of the top 10 rankings; and when you consider you are more topical authority, then that explains why Hugpages (all purpose site) is not ranking higher. Maybe its not all as complicated as you suggest.
Traffic for list building is a topic that has really frustrated me at the hands of the so-called Internet Marketing gurus. I have heard so many ideas and implemented a mishmash of them. Maybe I should go back to all my notebooks and try to condense everything that has been said and try to distill my own strategic framework out of it all. These are some of the things that stick in my mind:

This is nothing more than a long generic definition of what building a list is. It completely lacks the mechanics needed to actually begin building a mailing list. From a newbies perspective, we need specifics. For instance the blip in this tutorial simply states that AWeber can send out regularly scheduled emails but gentlemen--there is a whole process required to actually get this done. A person needs to create these promotions on their computer and and then load them up to the internet in order for this operation to function properly. Simple statements like you have an option with AWeber for HTML or Text is not sufficient. Where are the whys? and How To's? We need screen shots and maybe even videos detailing each step for this to all make any real sense. Building a mailing list is PROBABLY the most important key to becoming successful with internet marketing and this tutorial hardly scratches the surface.

For the initial launch of our blog, we mainly leveraged our network to get the word out about our new site. Most of the traffic for our initial first post came from posting on our personal Facebook pages as well as some Facebook groups that were focused around marketing and entrepreneurship such as From Wantrapreneur to Entrepreneur (a private group for people who’ve taken the SumoMe Building $1,000 monthly business course). We also tweeted from our personal accounts to get the word out. Finally, Benji emailed an old list of his that had 164 people on it, and got a 13.5% click rate, so that also drove some traffic.
I think what Brian and the testers are missing is that 15k is neither big enough to be impressive nor small enough to be inviting. It’s not a number that works effectively as social proof, and while I can’t test it out myself, I believe, based on evidence for social proof around the web, that DIYthemes would have had much better success with a combined number in the 50k+ range as mentioned above.

Choosing an AppSumo product their target audience would like, they let people enter to win it by taking specific actions such as subscribing via email and sharing on Twitter. Because of the viral nature of social sharing, these giveaways amplify the initial promotion to quickly reach a larger audience, all while increasing the visibility of specific AppSumo products.


Many marketers have “send fear” when it comes to emai marketing. They know that screwing up recipient’s names or preferences can lead to turned off subscribers and list decay. And it’s true– if you don’t do personalization correctly, you can wind up sending irrelevant messages to subscribers. However, this fear is getting in the way of marketers’ success, and the best way to move forward is to experiment with personalization. Start small, testing a few changes, and grow your strategy as you get more comfortable.
For instance, Geoff points out popups as potentially distracting elements on a website. He recommends their use on e-commerce sites, but less so on SaaS sites. He says, “You won’t see any pop-ups on our website. While we may miss out on some emails as a result, my argument is [that] this benefits our brand [and] our credibility, and keeps the bounce rate of our site visitors down.”
Your tip about CTA’s really hit the spot. I’ve been noticing that some of our competitors are using wordy yet highly specific buttons like ‘Get My Free Consultation Now!’ or ‘See Other Works From ____’. I was skeptic at first, but reading your logic behind it, it makes sense. I’m looking forward to implementing this on my own sites. Thank you, Brian.
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