People like more choices, so consider creating subscription levels that let people sign up to receive content that’s relevant to them. For example, if you sell widgets and tax advice, provide three options on your opt-in form that allow users to sign up to receive info about widgets, info about tax advice or both. Further customize by allowing them to designate how frequently they’d like to hear from you — weekly, monthly or only when something really special is going on. People may be more likely to sign up for your email list if they have some control over the content they’ll receive.
Brilliant! I know I probably shouldn’t be writing all just love what you’re saying here. But “love” what and “how” you are saying this here. I haven’t done the email thing yet, it’s something I’m ready to do and would benefit from too. But reading this today – found myself wanting to say, I would have wrote that – I want to copy and paste and tell others because you saved me the answer to myself being asked how do you do it Jane or errrrr zJayne!
Subscribers get on your lists through sign up forms, but are you collecting info that can help you improve engagement? Create a new sign up form and ask for information that you can use later. For example, Topshop asks for birthday information, which can allow them to send relevant birthday offers, horoscopes, and age-related messaging. The brand also asks whether the subscriber is a student, which will allow them to send related campaigns.
Fewer people on the list will buy the “expensive” products. But the idea is that, through your name collection/lead generation (often shortened to lead gen) efforts, you will be constantly bringing new names on to your list. Out of those, a certain percentage will buy. A smaller percentage will buy higher priced products. And the smallest percentage will buy your most expensive offerings. Think of them like the “whales” in a casino. You want to cultivate your back-end buyers by offering good products and great customer service. They’re VIPs.
Well Carson, fantastic information again and very done on the tutorial if I may say so. I'm still working on my site and in the process of finishing my review on Wealthy Affiliate and then at same time in the process of integrating and auto responder into everything. I have a real bad habit Carson, well more than one really, but the one I'm talking about is "multi tacking". I'm going to have to put a stop to that someday. I book marked this one for sure so I can go back to it later, thanks for this one again.
To incentivize the prospect to sign up, it’s important to offer them some sort of free bonus, like an ebook, access to a webinar, or whatever attractive freebie you can give them that is related to your business. But you shouldn't have to bust your butt to put this bonus together. You could collect together past blog posts into one PDF, for example.
This is nothing more than a long generic definition of what building a list is. It completely lacks the mechanics needed to actually begin building a mailing list. From a newbies perspective, we need specifics. For instance the blip in this tutorial simply states that AWeber can send out regularly scheduled emails but gentlemen--there is a whole process required to actually get this done. A person needs to create these promotions on their computer and and then load them up to the internet in order for this operation to function properly. Simple statements like you have an option with AWeber for HTML or Text is not sufficient. Where are the whys? and How To's? We need screen shots and maybe even videos detailing each step for this to all make any real sense. Building a mailing list is PROBABLY the most important key to becoming successful with internet marketing and this tutorial hardly scratches the surface.
The most obvious and logical place to find interested email subscribers is on your website itself. If users are visiting your website (regardless of whether they purchase or make a transaction), they have an interest in the information or content that you're providing. Every page of your website should include an email sign-up box that allows users to join your mailing list. We'll discuss the best practices for creating that email sign-up box later in this section. However, every visitor to your website is a potential email subscriber.
People like more choices, so consider creating subscription levels that let people sign up to receive content that’s relevant to them. For example, if you sell widgets and tax advice, provide three options on your opt-in form that allow users to sign up to receive info about widgets, info about tax advice or both. Further customize by allowing them to designate how frequently they’d like to hear from you — weekly, monthly or only when something really special is going on. People may be more likely to sign up for your email list if they have some control over the content they’ll receive.
Solo ads is essentially a method of paying someone to mail to their list for you. I don’t do this very often anymore but it is a very very effective way to jumpstart a list. If you followed along to a previous 30 day challenge I did on my old blog, Business & Blogs, you would have seen me go in to great depth about how I gained almost 1,000 new subscribers through solo ads alone.
If you choose a product everybody wants - like an iPad or an Amazon gift card - then you’re risking driving unqualified leads to your list. You don’t want to end up having to pay to have a bunch of unengaged people on your email list who aren’t interested in your topic and who will just unsubscribe the second you send them the next email and they haven’t won the giveaway.
Keep your content short and straightforward. Introductions to longer articles are fine, but emails should be just a few short paragraphs with a main call to action. And if you’re adding images, try to stay between a text to image ratio of 60:40 or 70:30 and remember to use alt tags for all images in case they don’t properly render for your recipient.

If that’s not enough to convince you to toss interstitials in the bin and never look back, there’s also the fact that users report these interactions as among their most-hated advertising practices (defined as ‘modals’ in this study by the Nielsen Norman Group). On a one to seven scale, modals (interstitials) landed at 5.82 for desktop users and 5.89 for mobile users, beating even autoplaying videos without skip for most-dreaded advertising type.

Learn the secrets to creating highly persuasive online growth systems which are proven (we actually do this stuff), sustainable (nothing "blackhat"), and personalized (based on where you are at today). We publish quality resources as well as paid training products to accelerate your success with sales funnels, increasing traffic with content, building your email list, or growing your client and product conversion rate.


To put these numbers into context: a myriad of data compiled on Twitter shows that the average click-through rate rarely tops 1.64 percent. Without paying for promotion, the average Facebook post is even worse. This is compared to email open rates, which hover around ~20% for many industries and can go up to as high as 40, 50, and 60 percent (and beyond!).
Please be advised that income and results shown are extraordinary and are not intended to serve as guarantees. In fact, as stipulated by law, we can not and do not make any guarantees about your ability to get results or earn any money with our ideas, information, tools or strategies. We don’t know you and, besides, your results in life are up to you. Agreed? We just want to help you by giving great content, direction and strategies that worked well for us and our students and that we believe can move you forward. All of our terms, privacy policies and disclaimers for this program and website can be accessed via the link below. We feel transparency is important and we hold ourselves (and you) to a high standard of integrity. Thanks for stopping by. We hope this training and content brings you a lot of value.
Quality subscribers (those who opted in to your emails and those who open, click, forward, and reply to your emails) are way more valuable to you than a BIG list of uninterested subscribers. Those uninterested subscribers can do real, long-term damage to your email marketing program. They’re the ones who are more likely to unsubscribe or mark your emails as spam.
One of the reasons I signed up with WA is because I was having problems filling out the info on Aweber. I couldn't figure out where my affiliate link was supposed to go. I still don't know. I've listened to YouTube tutorials then when I try to do what they say I get confused or have questions and there is no one to ask. One day I'll see the live chat button the next day it's gone. I know it's me but it is so frustrating.

Buffer – This one is the simplest and most practical for the purposes of promoting content since it will automatically try to share the content you pop into its feed to your social profiles at the most relevant time, maximizing exposure. The main downside they scaled back on their free plan so now you’re limited to connecting 2 or 3 social media profiles before they required you to upgrade. Regardless, it’s still very affordable and worth the $20 per month they charge.

Until recently the gurus stayed away from pushing paid traffic, maybe because they were wary of the horror stories. It is very clear that the easy days of cheap paid traffic are long gone. Cost per click is rising especially in popular niches. Paid traffic is also easy to get wrong. Quick Start Challenge view though is that paid traffic properly done delivers more consistent results especially when conditions change. The ad platforms always have a vested interest in keeping their ad revenues flowing. The same cannot be said on keeping your content presented on free platforms.

Mailchimp – This is the most affordable option on the market today and their email template design editor is quite feature rich. It also has a drag and drop interface. Their major downsides to Mailchimp is (a) they’re terrible, robotic customer support and (b) it feels like a lot more steps than are necessary to send a newsletter or to setup an autoresponder.

This is ideal if you’ve got an actual business to run, or maybe you have a day job and this is your side project. It’s simple enough to dedicate a few hours per week to showing up and creating content. Over time your site’s authority will increase in the search engines, you’ll develop word of mouth from your fans, and things will slowly pick up the pace.


Pop-up forms provide visitors with a quick, convenient way to share contact information and subscribe to your list while they’re browsing your site, making them a powerful tool for audience growth. They’re easy to add to your site, and they’re proven to work—our research shows that Mailchimp users have seen their list growth rate increase by an average of 50.8% after adding a pop-up form to their site.
Thank you for your comments RJ :) One thing just always sticks in my head and that is a comment made by highly reputable marketer. He basically had built up a sizeable list in Aweber and then because of a failed payment Aweber locked him out and he was unable to retrieve his leads. I think it is common knowledge that Aweber are not keen on biz ops etc . Can anyone else comment on this too? I know when I was actively promoting EN, EN reported that Aweber are not that keen on MLM etc so Get response was their new solution.
Similar to the process of advertising to build your email list on other websites, using search marketing to build email list can be equally effective. Build email landing pages specific to your email list and then optimize for organic search engine placement or paid, click-based search engine advertising. Again, however, if you do this, be sure that you have a handle on how much you can afford to pay per email sign-up as well as a way to track where email sign-ups came from. If you're not well versed in the marketing areas of search engine optimization or search engine marketing, you may want to consider hiring a professional to help you since both of those areas can be complicated to learn. However, many successful email lists have been built using search engines as the primary method for recruiting subscribers.
As marketers, we all know the importance of building, harvesting and growing our own list of email subscribers. Let's face it, having your own list is one of the best ways to guarantee your business a stable and recurring source of income. Instead of capturing clients all over again, you can create a cycle and monetize those subscribers over and over again.
The best part of the platform is it has a free version which one can use to run your own ads with credits from reading and rating ads. The free way to start is to use the ads surfing as a way to learn how to write good ad copy (headline less than 25 characters plus a message less than 60 characters) and good landing pages. Just follow what the 5 star ad writers do and build that into your free credit ads – keep doing this over and over until you are ready to go Pro.  I use the paid Pro version at $19.95 a month which gives me 10 Pro ads which I can deploy without needing credits. Any credits I collect are applied to Credit ads that I run as well.
The live video option on Facebook, for example, can be increasingly used to your advantage, where you can connect with so many people at the same time. While you are at it, you can create a live contest too, through your live video, and get your audience on your email list by asking them to participate by leaving their email in the comment section.
When you build a list, there are benefits that come with your subscriber base. You have the opportunity to track your emails (who received them, who opened them, etc). You can separate your list and segment it to those who want to receive certain emails or specific information. But more than anything else, you have a list of people who want to read your emails. Those can refer their friends to your business and help it grow through word of mouth.
HI Crispian... never worry about how long it takes you.. .you will find that you gel with some things instantly and other aspects of marketing really fox you. The important thing is not to give up and keep travelling forward. Remember the road to success is in zig zags never straight lines and I have so much respect for anyone trying to learn new things. There is such alot to learn in the beginning.. you almost have to learn a new language too - all the marketing lingo.. but if you stick with it, it doesn't take that long. Think of this as setting up a new business. If you went to university you would expect a course to take 5 years... so give yourself a break and don't worry about how long it takes... know one thing.. if you spent everyday for 5 years learning marketing, then you would have skills that would serve you for life! I think the mistake I made was thinking this could all be learnt in 5 minutes... I started in Feb 2013 and it is only now I am really seeing the birdseye view and feeling comfy with all the jargon. So now for me personally its time to get actually moving and take action... this is not a 5 minute game. This is a business opportunity and we will all give ourselves a much better chance of success if we actually understood that this really can be a key to financial success and time freedom... and with those things you can then help anybody or do anything :) best of luck
For effective and actionable results, you should do A/B tests, which test two (or more) different approaches. For example, you could send half of your list one subject line, and an alternate subject line to the other half. You could also A/B test the two approaches with a small subset of your list, then send the winning headline to the rest of the list.
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