Calls to Action Should you tell people to click right away or save the CTA for further along in the email? Should the button/link say “Click Here” or “Find Out More”? When it comes down to getting people to take action (the most important part of marketing), you simply must test a variety of elements to improve conversions, as this is one of the worst elements to leave to guesswork!
I’ll never forget the fun we had at those NFL celebrations at Regent Street in London, a couple of years back. My sister and I took part in a couple of games, one of which required yelling some American Football words at the top of our voices, and our mum was certain we were going to nail this. Sure this sounds supportive, but our mum’s focus was on “yelling”. Joke’s on her, we failed miserably (…we only caught “quarterback” out of all the words).
This exit-intent technology works by monitoring the movement of the mouse. When the system detects that a visitor is about to leave your site (by the movement of their mouse towards exiting the page or clicking bookmark links) a secondary message pops up to appeal to your visitors and engage with them further. Let’s see specifically how you can use this to maximise the number of visitors signing up for your newsletter.
These prospects are looking for products, services and information that can help them maximize the performance of their buildings. Building owners can be a great way to secure many big accounts through one point of contact. Direct your communication efforts toward this group of influential individuals and establish long-term customer relationships.

This is especially effective of course if the content you’re sharing is relevant to your own business, and if you’re sharing it to or with a group of your target audience. If you share highly relevant content on Facebook and your target audience clicks on it from your Snip.ly link, chances are they’ll also be interested in your content and opt-in offers. Use Snip.ly to add calls to action to all of the relevant content you share.


Your tip about CTA’s really hit the spot. I’ve been noticing that some of our competitors are using wordy yet highly specific buttons like ‘Get My Free Consultation Now!’ or ‘See Other Works From ____’. I was skeptic at first, but reading your logic behind it, it makes sense. I’m looking forward to implementing this on my own sites. Thank you, Brian.

Wow – now this is an exhaustive list of enough reasons to NOT fail when generating ideas to build your list. I particularly like the idea of hosting a JV giveaway as you can leverage different audiences and the cost is minimal for the exposure (providing you team up with a blogger who has an engaged audience). Guest posting is an interesting one as I believe to get more audience back to your page and build credibility, you really need to guest post on sites which have a loyal audience that engages with the author e.g. Adriennesmith.net or firepolemarketing.com . Great job with the post Ana 🙂

Many marketers have “send fear” when it comes to emai marketing. They know that screwing up recipient’s names or preferences can lead to turned off subscribers and list decay. And it’s true– if you don’t do personalization correctly, you can wind up sending irrelevant messages to subscribers. However, this fear is getting in the way of marketers’ success, and the best way to move forward is to experiment with personalization. Start small, testing a few changes, and grow your strategy as you get more comfortable.

The big splash works wonders because you capture the attention of the market. It’s the be everywhere at once advantage. But to understand how to pull off a launch, you need to know exactly how much time goes into it. The reason a big splash is different from a short burst is because there are usually months of time dedicated to the launch leading up to it. And by months, I mean upwards of 4 months for really big launches.


Someone who has done a great job of becoming known in many verticals is Chris Guillebeau, he sits at the intersection of many markets like travel, entrepreneurship, artists, and so on. I personally stumbled upon this idea with my different blogs and businesses in the raw food market, when I realized there was a lot of overlap and people would follow me from one topic to the next.
My suspicion is that our initial surge of subscribers has to do with what I mentioned at the top of this post: Our journey is compelling.  Plain and simple, people want to see if we can hit these numbers or not. (By the way, if you want to read our current articles — all which are very in depth articles with case studies and examples in each one about content marketing for real businesses, join our email list.)
Hi Crispian, I use GVO myself, yet would now only recommend Aweber or Get Response. GVO has a very 'messy' dashboard which is not crisp and clean. GVO also sells lots of other products such as hosting and webinar software and this can be very overwhelming if you are new to the industry. I have used Aweber a little and found it really easy to get started. It is one of the more expensive auto responders. I have only just opted for Get Response as it was recommended to me. I have been told that Get Response is a GREAT autoresponder , yet a little harder to get the hang of than aweber, yet worth the work of getting to grips with it. I have been told to stay away from ontraport as it is extremely complicated. GVO is not a scam in any way. It is a legitimate autoresponder, yet Aweber and Get Response are the more professional choice and are less likely to end up in peoples spam folders too. - ALSO WORTH NOTING , that anyone going into internet marketing niche can create an affiliate account with an autoresponder and when they recommend using one of preference, can gain a commission. I am not completely new to internet marketing , yet my action taking is new! Now , when I use a product for the first time, I try to get in the mindset that if I need it, then someone else will need it, and that if I can create a useful tutorial on things that 'foxed' me, then I can feel better about recommending the product as I can recommend and offer a helpful tutorial as a bonus - this is my mantra for 2015 - so if it helps, if anyone wants to go into the 'make money niche' , when you buy and use a product - take notes of what you found a stumbling block and then write helpful blogs or make helpful videos - it all comes full circle - google search - website - purchase. I hope that helps.... please let me know if any of this info is wrong :)
Hi Crispian, I use GVO myself, yet would now only recommend Aweber or Get Response. GVO has a very 'messy' dashboard which is not crisp and clean. GVO also sells lots of other products such as hosting and webinar software and this can be very overwhelming if you are new to the industry. I have used Aweber a little and found it really easy to get started. It is one of the more expensive auto responders. I have only just opted for Get Response as it was recommended to me. I have been told that Get Response is a GREAT autoresponder , yet a little harder to get the hang of than aweber, yet worth the work of getting to grips with it. I have been told to stay away from ontraport as it is extremely complicated. GVO is not a scam in any way. It is a legitimate autoresponder, yet Aweber and Get Response are the more professional choice and are less likely to end up in peoples spam folders too. - ALSO WORTH NOTING , that anyone going into internet marketing niche can create an affiliate account with an autoresponder and when they recommend using one of preference, can gain a commission. I am not completely new to internet marketing , yet my action taking is new! Now , when I use a product for the first time, I try to get in the mindset that if I need it, then someone else will need it, and that if I can create a useful tutorial on things that 'foxed' me, then I can feel better about recommending the product as I can recommend and offer a helpful tutorial as a bonus - this is my mantra for 2015 - so if it helps, if anyone wants to go into the 'make money niche' , when you buy and use a product - take notes of what you found a stumbling block and then write helpful blogs or make helpful videos - it all comes full circle - google search - website - purchase. I hope that helps.... please let me know if any of this info is wrong :)

The most obvious and logical place to find interested email subscribers is on your website itself. If users are visiting your website (regardless of whether they purchase or make a transaction), they have an interest in the information or content that you're providing. Every page of your website should include an email sign-up box that allows users to join your mailing list. We'll discuss the best practices for creating that email sign-up box later in this section. However, every visitor to your website is a potential email subscriber.


To get people to sign-up in the first place, you need to grab their attention and make it worth their while to sign up. Many website offer "FREE" information or products to people who sign-up with their mailing lists. This technique will work if you offer the website visitors something that is of "value" to them. Value has to go hand-in-hand with promotional materials within your emails. No one wants to be bombarded with sales pitches every time they open an email from you, so don't bother even sending out such emails. The best way to promote your product is to provide information that relates to your product, then add a few sentences that make reference to your product and how it can help with the reader achieve something.

My suspicion is that our initial surge of subscribers has to do with what I mentioned at the top of this post: Our journey is compelling.  Plain and simple, people want to see if we can hit these numbers or not. (By the way, if you want to read our current articles — all which are very in depth articles with case studies and examples in each one about content marketing for real businesses, join our email list.)

Unfortunately, there’s a bit too much depth to the topic for me to cram everything in to a single blog post. Therefore, I’m going to begin creating a multi-part blog series on list building. Over the next couple days, I’m going to purely focus on teaching some tricks of the trade to build a list quickly (these have now all been merged into this single post).

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