Drip offers a very small forever free plan, along with a two-week free trial for the Basic and Pro membership levels. If you choose to continue service after those two weeks, then your card will be charged. There is a 30-day refund window from when you start your service, but it’s up to the discretion of Drip whether you will receive a full refund.
Though it’s new to the marketplace and relatively unknown, more and more consultants and digitally based business owners are choosing ConvertKit thanks to their simple-yet-powerful tagging features for audience segmentation. Fans of ConvertKit also praise the simplicity of creating and visualizing email sequences, such as a series of welcome and “getting to know you” emails for new subscribers.
If you want to expand your reach even further, consider using paid social ads as part of your strategy to boost email opt-ins. Create ads that promote your email list opt-in offer, and deliver this ad content to individuals who are similar to your best customers. Social media platforms like Facebook offer effective targeting features (e.g. lookalike audiences) that allow you to reach those who are most likely to be interested in joining your email list.
Optimonk was started in the year 2014 with the view to revolutionize the way e-commerce sites improve conversions. They have created over 3000 e-commerce sites, including some of those sites which are now market leaders. You’ll be able to recover 15% of your abandon visitors with on-site retargeting and track visitor’s behavior, detect existing visitors, display targeted offers and boost conversion. It has a gamut of features like A/B testing, real-time analytics and so on. Integrates with various websites and e-commerce platforms, Optimonk is a perfect tool or the business e-commerce platform to improve their conversion rate.

As mentioned before, the type of email campaign you send depends entirely on your goals with email. If you’re looking to drive direct sales then sending marketing offer and announcement campaigns are going to return the best results, however if you are simply looking to keep your existing customers up-to-date on the latest projects, products or developments at your company, then sending a regular newsletter is going to be the best way to achieve that.
As far as I’m concerned, it’s a myth that you need to double opt-in all contacts. For example, if that requirement were turned on, I’m confident we would lose about 10% of our email subscribers. Not because they weren’t real people, but just because everyone is busy and emails can easily get buried. Part of the way I get around this is in using Wufoo forms and LeadPages, email addresses are directly imported into into our email marketing software via an API. This bypasses the normal double opt-in requirement. So even if we end up having some “fake” or mis-spelled contacts in our database, I’d rather have those AND a 10% larger list. Plus, if an email address bounces, it’s automatically cleaned from our database.
Presentation is everything, or so they say. With this old adage in mind, we’ve compiled our best tips for anyone who wants to send emails that subscribers click into a handy email design guide. We cover each facet of design: content, templates, identity, color, images, layout, fonts, and calls to action. Design is as much science as it is art, and we take the guesswork out of what can seem like the most challenging part of sending good emails.
This is a topic I plan to write more on in the future, but I’ll briefly summarize it here. When a little old website called Mint.com launched back around 2008, a quick glance at their footer links and you would notice something interesting. Each link had “rich anchor text” (meaning the words used for the link were purposefully chosen) and the pages they linked to were landing pages. Taking note of this strategy, when I launched my previous business, BlueSkyLocal.com, in 2009 I made sure we followed the same strategy (see below). The website was young and had few inbound links at the time. However, I knew that but crafting valuable (simple) landing pages with information that users on the web were searching for, we could naturally start to capture some organic traffic. And we did. The site still gets traffic today even though I haven’t touched it in years. Here’s what one of those landing pages looked like: The idea was that by branching off key pieces of content from our homepage (kind of like a sunflower plant branches petals our from its core), we driving more free trial sign-ups. And we did (until we made the Jenius move of removing our free trial option of course — but that’s a story for another day 😉  ) This strategy can work just as well for you when it comes to building your email list:
Quick note on this before I give examples… While on a recent trip overseas it was explained to me by a fellow entrepreneur local to the area that no one “trusted” it when companies put the logos etc. of third parties on their website. Hopefully it doesn’t get to this point in the USA so I caution you to always use REAL social proof (don’t fake it, or I will find you and… signup for your newsletter with a fake email address just to spite you). If you don’t have any well-know press logos you can use right now, read this article I wrote on how to get free press. Now to wrap it up with some social proof CTA examples: This one is from the upper right corner of our blog. Here’s one from Backlino: And here’s one from Derek Halpern’s blog, Social Triggers:
Another type of marketing email that is important for your small business email marketing strategy is the email drip campaign. This is an automated email message that is sent to subscribers on a schedule. These emails can also be triggered when the subscriber takes a certain action, such as downloading an e-book or abandoning their cart after visiting your site.
I so often forget that people can sign up to an email list in places other than an email capture form on my site. Depending on your email software, there is likely a landing page devoted to acquiring email signups. You can get the link and share it in a huge number of different places like email signatures, social media messages, and guest blog bios.
In addition to satisfying legal requirements, email service providers (ESPs) began to help customers establish and manage their own email marketing campaigns. The service providers supply email templates and general best practices, as well as methods for handling subscriptions and cancellations automatically. Some ESPs will provide insight and assistance with deliverability issues for major email providers. They also provide statistics pertaining to the number of messages received and opened, and whether the recipients clicked on any links within the messages.
Mailchimp offers a forever free plan which allows you to send 12,000 emails for up to 2,000 subscribers. This plan is fairly limited because you don’t features like send-time optimization, advanced segmentation, multi-variate testing, etc. You are also required to display their branding in your email. Last but not least, support is restricted to email only, and you may find it not as helpful.
The Content Upgrade is a tactic that’s been around for a while, probably popularized in more recent years due HubSpot (an inbound marketing company) practicing it on every one of their blog posts. The basic definition of a content upgrade is this: on every article you publish on your blog, you create a simple bonus or “extra” that a visitor can get access to by providing their email. The bonus offer is something related to what is discussed in the article. For example, last week I wrote about “Pumpkin Hacking” as it relates to SEO. In that article I posted links to download my “Pumpkin Hacking Checklist” which is a 4 page PDF download (and FYI, it’s less work than it sounds like — the 4 pages is mostly because I wrote in a large font). Of course, you don’t have to create a checklist as the upgrade:
How is 7.5 okay? I think that it’s a great score, especially when you take into consideration that it’s an averaged score of several hundred people’s opinion… Shopify and BigCommerce (I don’t agree that they should have the same score) are very good builders. Yes, they are only for stores, and there are different free website creators that might take their place due to them being free, but they do their job very well. It’s better to be a master at a trade, unlike the other builders – jack of all trades, master of none.
Promote up-sells/cross-sells. You can even set up an autoresponder sequence for someone after they purchase and get repeat customers. Depending on the products you sell, you could offer an upsell, or cross-sell related products. For example, if someone buys a digital camera, you can offer to add a lens, a tripod, and other accessories to their order before it ships. Or, if you sell products that people buy frequently (like food or disposable items, like diapers), you can automatically send them offers for new items when you know they’re about due for another order.
Many consumers have reservations about online behavioral targeting. By tracking users' online activities, advertisers are able to understand consumers quite well. Advertisers often use technology, such as web bugs and respawning cookies, to maximizing their abilities to track consumers.[60]:60[95] According to a 2011 survey conducted by Harris Interactive, over half of Internet users had a negative impression of online behavioral advertising, and forty percent feared that their personally-identifiable information had been shared with advertisers without their consent.[96][97] Consumers can be especially troubled by advertisers targeting them based on sensitive information, such as financial or health status.[95] Furthermore, some advertisers attach the MAC address of users' devices to their 'demographic profiles' so they can be retargeted (regardless of the accuracy of the profile) even if the user clears their cookies and browsing history.[citation needed]
×