Email deliverability is an important part of your small business email marketing efforts. If users are not opening your emails, moving them directly to their trash or junk folders, or reporting your marketing emails as spam, this can take a toll on your deliverability rates. Your email deliverability impacts your ability to show up in user’s inboxes, so you want to marked as spam or penalized.
In 2002 the European Union (EU) introduced the Directive on Privacy and Electronic Communications. Article 13 of the Directive prohibits the use of personal email addresses for marketing purposes. The Directive establishes the opt-in regime, where unsolicited emails may be sent only with prior agreement of the recipient; this does not apply to business email addresses.
Where they can improve: Autoresponders are on the basic side – just enough to set up the most simple triggered campaigns. It doesn’t come with a huge template range, either (and none on the free plan), so you’ll probably need to use their visual editor to create your own. Finally, it doesn’t offer a spam or design testing feature – if you wanted these, they’d need to be performed externally.
In both of these examples, it’s important to note that the lead form is simple and only asks for the necessary contact information, such as email and first name. The more contact information you ask for, the less likely your leads will be to fill out the form. You will need to work to build trust before you can gather the rest of their contact information. However, for the purposes of building your email list, you only need their email address. Work on getting any other information you need later after you’ve established a relationship with the customer.
Here’s a great example I can give you for step 1. I was curious to figure out which traffic source was sending us the highest converting traffic. And when I say “converting” I mean, obviously, converting from a visitor to an email subscriber. My theory was that the answer would be organic traffic from Google… But I was 100% wrong. No literally, I was 100% wrong because traffic coming into our site from LinkedIn converted 100% better (or twice as well) as Google. So in this example, to “scale that peak” of our highest converting traffic source, I need to figure out a way for use to grow our inbound traffic coming from LinkedIn. Here’s another example, not related to email but still relevant… I found our that our audience really likes articles that include multiple forms of media (video, images, and text). So I did more of those and as a result we grew our traffic as a result of more visitors sharing our articles. Simple, right? Of course, it goes without saying that I put significant effort into making sure the articles were good. So to review, find out which tactics or channels convert best and then double down on each one to grow your email list. If you’re curious to see the full interview where Noah mentions this concept, I’ve embedded the video below.
I already mentioned that you should use social media to grow your email list, but you should also use your newsletters as a way to grow your social media profiles as well. The simplest and most effective way is to add the social media buttons in your newsletter so that your subscribers can share the content but also connect with you in the various social networks.
Some sources state that 25% of the websites using content systems are using WordPress. Although started purely for blogging, now you can create amazing websites for any vertical using pre-made themes and templates. The advantages of WP is a huge community (that works to improve the product), and large marketplaces to cater for plugins, designs, technical help and much more.  The learning curve is not too steep, but possibilities are endless.
Online banner advertising began in the early 1990s as page owners sought additional revenue streams to support their content. Commercial online service Prodigy displayed banners at the bottom of the screen to promote Sears products. The first clickable web ad was sold by Global Network Navigator in 1993 to a Silicon Valley law firm.[16] In 1994, web banner advertising became mainstream when HotWired, the online component of Wired Magazine, sold banner ads to AT&T and other companies. The first AT&T ad on HotWired had a 44% click-through rate, and instead of directing clickers to AT&T's website, the ad linked to an online tour of seven of the world's most acclaimed art museums.[17][18]
Many consumers have reservations about online behavioral targeting. By tracking users' online activities, advertisers are able to understand consumers quite well. Advertisers often use technology, such as web bugs and respawning cookies, to maximizing their abilities to track consumers.[60]:60[95] According to a 2011 survey conducted by Harris Interactive, over half of Internet users had a negative impression of online behavioral advertising, and forty percent feared that their personally-identifiable information had been shared with advertisers without their consent.[96][97] Consumers can be especially troubled by advertisers targeting them based on sensitive information, such as financial or health status.[95] Furthermore, some advertisers attach the MAC address of users' devices to their 'demographic profiles' so they can be retargeted (regardless of the accuracy of the profile) even if the user clears their cookies and browsing history.[citation needed] 
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