Matt Ackerson founded AutoGrow (Petovera Inc.) in 2010 as a conversion-focused web design agency. The company has since worked one-on-one with over 500 customers and clients to create their sales funnels. Matt is a graduate of Cornell University. He and AutoGrow have been featured in Techcrunch, Forbes, Inc, Venture Beat, Mashable, and Popular Science among others. He and the team write in-depth articles on digital marketing, sales funnel design, and also offer an advanced funnel training course here on AutoGrow.co
This is a topic I plan to write more on in the future, but I’ll briefly summarize it here. When a little old website called Mint.com launched back around 2008, a quick glance at their footer links and you would notice something interesting. Each link had “rich anchor text” (meaning the words used for the link were purposefully chosen) and the pages they linked to were landing pages. Taking note of this strategy, when I launched my previous business, BlueSkyLocal.com, in 2009 I made sure we followed the same strategy (see below). The website was young and had few inbound links at the time. However, I knew that but crafting valuable (simple) landing pages with information that users on the web were searching for, we could naturally start to capture some organic traffic. And we did. The site still gets traffic today even though I haven’t touched it in years. Here’s what one of those landing pages looked like: The idea was that by branching off key pieces of content from our homepage (kind of like a sunflower plant branches petals our from its core), we driving more free trial sign-ups. And we did (until we made the Jenius move of removing our free trial option of course — but that’s a story for another day 😉  ) This strategy can work just as well for you when it comes to building your email list:
This is a topic I plan to write more on in the future, but I’ll briefly summarize it here. When a little old website called Mint.com launched back around 2008, a quick glance at their footer links and you would notice something interesting. Each link had “rich anchor text” (meaning the words used for the link were purposefully chosen) and the pages they linked to were landing pages. Taking note of this strategy, when I launched my previous business, BlueSkyLocal.com, in 2009 I made sure we followed the same strategy (see below). The website was young and had few inbound links at the time. However, I knew that but crafting valuable (simple) landing pages with information that users on the web were searching for, we could naturally start to capture some organic traffic. And we did. The site still gets traffic today even though I haven’t touched it in years. Here’s what one of those landing pages looked like: The idea was that by branching off key pieces of content from our homepage (kind of like a sunflower plant branches petals our from its core), we driving more free trial sign-ups. And we did (until we made the Jenius move of removing our free trial option of course — but that’s a story for another day 😉  ) This strategy can work just as well for you when it comes to building your email list:

And that leads us right into understanding service pricing and packaging. The email marketing services we reviewed range from about $5 per month to as much as $20 per month for a range of features. Many email marketing plans include unlimited email sends each month and bill you based on the number of subscribers. If you have a small list, then look for a company that offers a free plan, a low-cost plan for several hundred subscribers, or even a pay-as-you-go plan. On the flip side, many of these services also offer high-volume plans with up to 100,000 or more contacts. Sometimes this requires a custom plan that has to be arranged directly with a sales rep. If you're willing to commit, then look for the companies that offer discounts if you pay yearly rather than monthly. A few offer also money-back guarantees.
Experts like Joe Pulizzi, founder of Content Marketing Institute, believes that an email list is critical as one cannot build his/her own content on a rented land. He continues saying that the first step is to collect email addresses whereby a person can understand who are his/her readers and hopefully they will be his/her, customer, soon. If a person’s goal is to drive sales or keep customers happy in some way, then he/she would first have to get them as part of his/her audience.
This rating looks at the learning curve, or time required to learn to use the platform. An easy to use interface is fundamentally important to ensure that users feel confortable working with the platform and doesn’t require complex training to take advantage of its features. This also accounts for the average time it takes to build a presentation. 
Construction management software — This software allows users to oversee offsite construction crews and follow along with their progress. Along with managing the project, other features may include punch lists, time tracking, expense management, and more. Some construction management tools may already offer BIM capabilities. But for those solutions that don’t offer those functionalities, BIM should be able to fill in the gaps.
Getting started shouldn't be daunting. Generally, you'll know right away whether you like a user interface (UI) or not, and most of the contenders we reviewed offer free trials so you can poke around before dropping any cash. Luckily, most of these services have modern-looking graphics and uncluttered layouts. These are not the complex business software UIs of yesterday. Be careful, though, as some free trials require a credit card. This means you need to be sure to cancel your trial before you're billed if you're not happy with the service.
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