I don’t know, maybe I am not as experienced but my priority is – everything must be simple to use but come off as professional as possible. As well as automation, for now my resources are limited and I want to optimize as much as I can. So I dabbed with main email marketing services and the one that managed to really “Stick” with me was “Omnisend”. Great automation workflows – don’t have to worry about anything, welcome, birthday, cart recovery emails. As well as amazing newsletter builder. Just all in all a flexible tool for not as flexible audience.
Internet audience is fast moving, and they tend to go from one to another in a fraction of a second. So every aspect of your user interface counts when you are trying to get their attention. Having a beautifully designed web page will not always lead to the fact that you’ll be having lots of visitors to your website who would come back again and again.

Out of all the channels I tested as a marketer, email continually outperforms most of them. Not only does it have a high conversion rate, but as you build up your list, you can continually monetize it by pitching multiple products. Just look at ecommerce sites like Amazon: One way they get you to continually buy more products from them is by emailing you offers on a regular basis.
“I recently had some white space in a newsletter I couldn’t get rid of. So I called customer support and they explained the image needed to be resized and the issue was cleared up immediately. A great thing about Constant Contact is if you’re having a problem, you can just pick up the phone and someone will solve your problem in a matter of minutes.”
Where they can improve: The automation editor lacks a workflow view, so isn’t the most intuitive to use. List management isn’t the best, either – it doesn’t remove duplicates and lists are kept isolated from another. It also has one of the strictest acceptable use policies, and isn’t ideal if your business deals with affiliate marketing, healthcare products, real estate or novelty products. And it’s certainly not the cheapest provider out there – surprising, given its popularity (which just goes to show the power of great marketing!). Note – we’ve noticed that emails from MailChimp tend to go to Gmail’s Promotions folder.
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This article is informative, but it does not offer distinguishing features between the services covered (other than mailchimp is free). You seemed to go to great lengths to say good things about each – although I’m sure each services has positive aspects. I would have benefited much more from a rating of some sort of the various features of each service, or at least the pros & cons of each.

Brian , your every post is like a book, I always read your post and try to find a few questions to ask .. but to be honest your posts are that comprehensive that, I don’t find a question to ask because you left nothing unexplained ! I wonder how long you take to prepare a post like this, I probably would take a whole year ! 🙂 Good luck Brian. you are a magician of IM strategies.
One other advantage that doing email list promotions like this, whether you’re doing it as a JV webinar partnership or as a marketing alliance, is that you have the option of doing a 1-click optin. This is especially easy if you have a LeadPages or Infusionsoft account. But you can do something similar using Mailchimp and other basic email marketing programs using the “mail merge” feature. For instance:
Omnisend is an email service that helps online store owners take their email campaigns to the next level. Aside from a long list of clever ecommerce automations like abandoned cart campaigns and product recommendation emails, Omnisend also offers unique features such as online scratch cards, gift boxes, and ‘wheel of fortune’ incentives. A/B testing and website tracking are included, too.
The first known large-scale non-commercial spam message was sent on 18 January 1994 by an Andrews University system administrator, by cross-posting a religious message to all USENET newsgroups.[12] In January 1994 Mark Eberra started the first email marketing company for opt in email list under the domain Insideconnect.com. He also started the Direct Email Marketing Association to help stop unwanted email and prevent spam. [13] [14]
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