Yes, when you log out of Ark, your body stays exactly where you left it in a perilous state of purgatory. If you have not used your survival building games know-how to put together a smartly designed base and protect yourself from the elements, prepare to see your progress swiftly eaten up. That counts for your food, farming supplies, and crafting equipment, too.
“This is a great question. Email is a focus for us internally this year and we have had success in a number of ways. In fact the answer appears to be utilising a number of different channels but the majority of our success comes from the promotion of our content resources. We have carried out a lot of testing to figure out the best way of lowering the cost of conversion as much as possible. That process has seen us focus down more and more on theses three areas:
Software Developers will need to have a degree in some field of computer science. Most software developers working for email marketing services will be experts in HTML, Java, and other programming languages that are used widely on the Internet. A degree in marketing is not necessary, but could be helpful. Their clients will mostly be marketers, so understanding their needs can lead to more useful and responsive email programs.
I talked about generic exit-detection popups in an earlier point, but now let’s talk about a more advanced version of that email collection strategy. To review: Exit detection popups are a “smarter” form of email capture popup. It appears when it detects that the mouse from a visitor is moving off the page, towards the top, and he or she is probably about to hit the back button or type in a new web address (example below) There are a number of free options for this, but none of them work as well as the paid exit-detection popups that are out there. I personally use and recommend Optin Monster which costs $199. The biggest benefits to using something like Optin Monster is that you can A/B test your pop-ups AND set specific popups to appear on specific pages.  So, creating an exit-intent popup is a macro optimization you can make to your site, where as creating page-specific exit pop-ups is a micro optimization which leads to higher conversion rates as that individual pages level. Why? Well, think about it. If you’re reading an article about, say, building your email list and you see either

Many people mistakenly believe that the only method for getting a professional quality website is to hire a web developer. But, by selecting the right website builder, you can achieve similar results for a much lower cost. Additionally, you maintain full control over the look of your website as you don’t have to rely on paying your original developer or finding a new one, every time you want to make a change.

What we liked: The tool just looks cool, with a black background and icons that pop with colour (imagine Spotify, but for email marketing). It’s also easy to use, and has a zippy and intuitive email editor. We really like the effort they’ve put into their email templates, too, which are some of the nicest looking we’ve seen. Plus, they’ve baked plenty of flexibility into their email editor, allowing you to tweak templates pretty much as you please.
Treat your list well. Remember that the people you're using email to communicate with have trusted you with their email and name; they deserve your respect. Just as you deserve as a chance to convert them from customers to fans and even evangelists for your brand, people who want to talk about and share your message and get involved in any way they can.
According to a study (PDF) published in the Journal of Consumer Research, people shy away from single option offers. However, when presented with multiple options, we are more likely to make a purchase decision on the spot (about 3x more likely in fact according the research). For this reason you want to consider giving people multiple options to optin for your offers. For example, here’s how I do it on our free course widget: Here’s another (perhaps even more effective) example from Michael Hyatt’s website. What I like about how Michael does it here is the fact that he truly give your two choices, not just two calls to action. One choice will sign-up immediately. The other will take you to a landing page where you can learn a little more and then optin there. Very smart, copy this on your own website.
The first known large-scale non-commercial spam message was sent on 18 January 1994 by an Andrews University system administrator, by cross-posting a religious message to all USENET newsgroups.[12] In January 1994 Mark Eberra started the first email marketing company for opt in email list under the domain Insideconnect.com. He also started the Direct Email Marketing Association to help stop unwanted email and prevent spam. [13] [14]
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