1) I would set up a MailChimp account, for free. It’s the industry leader, it’s the best performer (in my experience) and it’s the most pleasant to use from a UX/UI standpoint (which matters a lot to me). It’s also entirely free from the get-go, up until a couple thousand subscribers. It’s a “no-duh” piece of software. This let you easily segment your lists depending on sign-up locations, or sign up types. If you have email resources to push subscribers – like Bidsketch does with their proposal templates – you can easily segment the users that sign up there, apart from the users that sign up straight from your blog.
This relatively new email provider is steadily building a reputation for itself as a decent, value-for-money tool. Why? Because, for the low price you pay, you get a surprisingly generous amount of features, including landing pages, marketing automation and advanced segmentation. What’s more – MailerLite make the tool super accessible with an easy-to-use interface, and by offering a decently-featured free plan for up to 1,000 subscribers.
In both of these examples, it’s important to note that the lead form is simple and only asks for the necessary contact information, such as email and first name. The more contact information you ask for, the less likely your leads will be to fill out the form. You will need to work to build trust before you can gather the rest of their contact information. However, for the purposes of building your email list, you only need their email address. Work on getting any other information you need later after you’ve established a relationship with the customer.
It makes sense: the people who visit your blog post or web page are looking for something specific, so your CTA needs to meet those unique needs. For instance, if you’ve got a ton of traffic visiting your “List-Building Strategy” blog article, why not entice those people to subscribe to your email list by including a simple CTA like this: “Click here to download a free list-building toolkit.”
We’ll warn you right now that as you’re evaluating different email platforms, you’ll likely be tempted to focus a lot of your attention on which platform has the prettiest email templates. This is understandable. But unless you have an e-commerce company and are selling a physical product online, the truth is that the visual aesthetics of your emails are not the most important factor.
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