3) I would then set up List Builder from SumoMe on blog pages. Noah Kagan and his group at AppSumo have put together this awesome little pop-up tool that will show over the center of your screen asking you to sign-up, or you can easily click outside of the box to cancel it out. The thing is, initially all of my clients would say “I don’t want a spammy pop-up on my site, people will hate us!” But truly this has had tiny effects on bounce rates (meaning people aren’t really leaving because of this, they’re simply clicking the box away) yet they’ve had a massive effect on subscriber sign ups. List Builder also integrates with MailChimp, so all of these 3 tools work seamlessly together.
While this might seem surprising at first, think about your own online behavior: When you sign up for a website (like an online store), you have to enter your email address to create the account. You even need an email address to create a Facebook or Twitter account. What’s more, Facebook and Twitter email to notify users of activity, like when someone is tagged in a photo.
"News Feed Ads", also called "Sponsored Stories", "Boosted Posts", typically exist on social media platforms that offer a steady stream of information updates ("news feed"[38]) in regulated formats (i.e. in similar sized small boxes with a uniform style). Those advertisements are intertwined with non-promoted news that the users are reading through. Those advertisements can be of any content, such as promoting a website, a fan page, an app, or a product.
Lastly we come to full-body workouts. The 5 x 5 program could also be considered a full-body workout program to a degree, since you work almost all the major muscle groups with the three exercises you choose. But, true full-body programs will provide one direct exercise for each muscle group - quads, hamstrings, chest, back and shoulders (arms are worked when doing chest and back).
Rob, you don’t say who ‘booted’ you from using it. A significant GDPR factor is non-profits having to consent/re-consent those on established email lists and experiencing significant proportions of lists being lost because people miss the notifications or are too busy to fill in yet more forms. However, I have found a few using a ‘one-touch’ re-subscription button that takes immediate effect, without the recipient having to do anything else. It would appear that the re-subscription rate is higher, the easier it is to activate. On enquiry, I was told that they were using mail chimp for this.
The Content Upgrade is a tactic that’s been around for a while, probably popularized in more recent years due HubSpot (an inbound marketing company) practicing it on every one of their blog posts. The basic definition of a content upgrade is this: on every article you publish on your blog, you create a simple bonus or “extra” that a visitor can get access to by providing their email. The bonus offer is something related to what is discussed in the article. For example, last week I wrote about “Pumpkin Hacking” as it relates to SEO. In that article I posted links to download my “Pumpkin Hacking Checklist” which is a 4 page PDF download (and FYI, it’s less work than it sounds like — the 4 pages is mostly because I wrote in a large font). Of course, you don’t have to create a checklist as the upgrade:
Click through rates. Once your subscribers have opened your email, are they actually taking the action you need them to take? If you think that you have a low click-through rate, perhaps your body copy is not as effective as it needs to be. Consider the following: Is the copy of your email relevant to the subject line? Did you offer real value to your subscribers in the email? Is your call-to-action clear enough? Is the link easy to find?
This is a more advanced tactic for those of you using video to market your business. According to JLBmedia, 78% of internet users watch video once per week and 55% watch it at least once per day. Since video is so widely consumed, it makes sense that if you’re going to include it as part of your website’s sales funnel or on a blog post it you should get position it to generate more email subscribers for you. Here’s how it works:
The most important element for launching an email marketing campaign is giving subscribers what they want and being consistent on your delivery with this value. Subscribers expect to see emails on a regular schedule, whether that’s daily, weekly, monthly, or even quarterly. If you fall short of their expectations, it will reflect poorly on your brand. Remember that you can always start out by sending emails less often and then ramp up efforts and send more frequently later.
When I think about the brands I like best, like J. Crew, Spotify, and SoulCycle, I know I’m not a loyal brand advocate because of their products alone. I can get cheaper clothes, music, and groceries from plenty of other places. Ultimately, I’m a brand advocate because I believe in what they promote and I feel invested in their stories, like SoulCycle’s: “We aspire to inspire. We inhale intention and exhale expectation.” I relate to their brand messaging.
As advertisers have shifted more and more of their efforts online, they have tried to find ways to use the strategies developed in print advertising in new online environments. Most of the traffic once handled by the postal service now happens over email, creating a new method of direct marketing. Today, the average marketer sends 64 emails to their customers every year.
But engaging with a new customer isn’t a one-and-done affair. That’s why you want the ability to create an automated email sequence that “indoctrinates” new subscribers to your brand through a series of emails in the week or so after they sign up. This is just one of many instances where email sequencing can be the most powerful tool in your brand’s email marketing toolbox—so make sure the platform you choose has strong sequencing functionality!
Whether you choose your own layout or use a predesigned template, the emails are broken up into various content blocks, such as image, text, boxed text, buttons, social shares and navigation bars, which you can tailor any way you like. You can adjust its size, add in text, and change the font size, alignment and color. You can also choose background colors for not only each box, but the entire message, and add or delete content blocks. The robust photo-editing tool allows you to alter photos by size, brightness, and contrast and to add effects and frames to them.
The Offer Finally, if/when you send out those “money” emails (especially for re-marketing purposes, which we will discuss later on), you need to test out offers. An extra 15-days to try the product, or a $10 discount for being on the newsletter? Should you offer an incentive to those who have signed up but haven’t gotten started with your product, or just send a reminder? Find out the answers with split-testing! 
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