Send new subscribers a “welcome” sequence. This is the message that you send to people right after they subscribe to your email list. It could contain a link to your lead magnet for an easy download, a thank you for subscribing, or maybe a call-to-action to check out your most popular blog posts. Every email list needs a welcome series: don’t miss this chance to “woo” your new subscribers and turn them into loyal fans!
I talked about generic exit-detection popups in an earlier point, but now let’s talk about a more advanced version of that email collection strategy. To review: Exit detection popups are a “smarter” form of email capture popup. It appears when it detects that the mouse from a visitor is moving off the page, towards the top, and he or she is probably about to hit the back button or type in a new web address (example below) There are a number of free options for this, but none of them work as well as the paid exit-detection popups that are out there. I personally use and recommend Optin Monster which costs $199. The biggest benefits to using something like Optin Monster is that you can A/B test your pop-ups AND set specific popups to appear on specific pages.  So, creating an exit-intent popup is a macro optimization you can make to your site, where as creating page-specific exit pop-ups is a micro optimization which leads to higher conversion rates as that individual pages level. Why? Well, think about it. If you’re reading an article about, say, building your email list and you see either

While we would prefer good news all the time, it’s important to know that not every email will be a smash success. And that’s okay. And totally normal! Because of that reality, take the same amount of time to look at emails that didn’t perform as well as you hoped. Make sure you have clear calls to action, your links are all working correctly, and the content is interesting.


Email marketing has evolved rapidly alongside the technological growth of the 21st century. Prior to this growth, when emails were novelties to the majority of customers, email marketing was not as effective. In 1978, Gary Thuerk of Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) sent out the first mass email[1] to approximately 400 potential clients via the Advanced Research Projects Agency Network (ARPANET). He claims that this resulted in $13 million worth of sales in DEC products,[2] and highlighted the potential of marketing through mass emails.

Knowing what works is great. You can continue building on previous success. Equally as important is to recognize where you can improve. While it’s easier (and more fun) to focus on the positive, acknowledging where you can make adjustments will improve your products and services. With email marketing software, it becomes easy to gather such data by tracking conversion and click-through rates.
We’ll warn you right now that as you’re evaluating different email platforms, you’ll likely be tempted to focus a lot of your attention on which platform has the prettiest email templates. This is understandable. But unless you have an e-commerce company and are selling a physical product online, the truth is that the visual aesthetics of your emails are not the most important factor.
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