Now that we’ve covered our laundry list of various platforms—do you know what features you should be looking for in an email marketing platform? If you don’t actually understand what email marketing can do, you might find yourself choosing your software based solely on branding, price, or pretty templates. And that’s no way to make a major business decision!

Brian. You talk about how all these variables matter in getting this article to rank #1 for “list building” and how competitors have way more links than you, but then you also consider your DA and your PA together, you have almost the highest score out of the top 10 rankings; and when you consider you are more topical authority, then that explains why Hugpages (all purpose site) is not ranking higher. Maybe its not all as complicated as you suggest.
Drip – Drip from Leadpages includes a visual campaign builder that allows businesses to design email campaigns based on their subscribers' actions, decisions, goals, delays and exits. Features include automation, a lead-scoring algorithm that tracks several events to determine which subscribers are most engaged with your content and likely to become customers, and the ability to send targeted emails. Drip integrates with a variety of CRM, e-commerce, forms and surveys, lead capture, marketing automation, and membership and payment processing tools. drip.com
Ad blocking, or ad filtering, means the ads do not appear to the user because the user uses technology to screen out ads. Many browsers block unsolicited pop-up ads by default.[87] Other software programs or browser add-ons may also block the loading of ads, or block elements on a page with behaviors characteristic of ads (e.g. HTML autoplay of both audio and video). Approximately 9% of all online page views come from browsers with ad-blocking software installed,[88] and some publishers have 40%+ of their visitors using ad-blockers.[3]

What is email marketing? Basically the use of email to promote products and/or services. But a better email marketing definition is the use of email to develop relationships with potential customers and/or clients. Email marketing is one segment of internet marketing, which encompasses online marketing via websites, social media, blogs, etc. It is essentially the same as direct mail except that instead of sending mail through the postal service, messages are sent electronically via email.


There are tons of software and automation tools out there that make email marketing a breeze. For example, MailChimp and Constant Contact can be used to send out emails and monitor how your subscribers interact with your emails. You can also use email marketing software to track analytics like click-through rates, open rates, bounce rates, and conversions.  
Blue Corona is much more than an SEO or email marketing company—we truly see ourselves as an internet marketing partner to your business. We market your business as if it were our own—meaning we strive to truly understand your services, products, sales process, competitors, industry, and markets to effectively market your company on the web, all while tracking and measurably justifying your investment in our online marketing services.
The Content Upgrade is a tactic that’s been around for a while, probably popularized in more recent years due HubSpot (an inbound marketing company) practicing it on every one of their blog posts. The basic definition of a content upgrade is this: on every article you publish on your blog, you create a simple bonus or “extra” that a visitor can get access to by providing their email. The bonus offer is something related to what is discussed in the article. For example, last week I wrote about “Pumpkin Hacking” as it relates to SEO. In that article I posted links to download my “Pumpkin Hacking Checklist” which is a 4 page PDF download (and FYI, it’s less work than it sounds like — the 4 pages is mostly because I wrote in a large font). Of course, you don’t have to create a checklist as the upgrade:
There are a couple things we love about this email example from PayPal. Not only is the opening copy clever and concise, but the entire concept also reflects a relatable benefit of using the service. Think about it: How many times have you been in a situation where you went out to dinner with friends and then fussed over the bill when it came time to pay? By tapping into this common pain point, PayPal is able to pique the interest of its audience. 
Lead Pages is probably one of the best investments I made in the last month. I can’t say enough about how useful their lead generation software is for quickly creating landing pages that are designed to convert. Particularly, their LeadBoxes feature I’ve found to be the most useful. A LeadBox allows you to turn an image or some text into a link that shows a pop-up optin box when clicked. Why is it useful to show a pop-up optin form instead of embedding it directly on the page? Good question. The reason this is useful is because showing offers that lead to a popup or landing page are perceived as GIVING value rather than a form, which is perceived as TAKING value. From testing, the LeadPages team found that this could raise the conversion rate by about 39%. Ryan Deis, co-founder of SurvivalLife.com (a $1 million+ per month blog) found this to be true as well. Another part of the “magic” behind Lead Pages that few people realize is the fact that, if I opt-in on website A (which has Lead Pages installed) and I go and visit website B (which also have LeadPages installed), when I click a link and see a LeadBox, my email will already be filled in. This is because Lead Boxes cookies each visitor of each website visited, so when you see another landing page or pop-up, they know “hey, ok, this person is [email protected]” As a result, people have to “work” less and conversion rates are pushed even higher.
So many brands and companies build their audiences on Facebook and Google+, which is fine, but we don’t own those names – Facebook and Google do. If we are thinking like real media companies, the asset is in the audience. Getting an email address is the first critical step to figuring out who my reader is and, hopefully in the future, my customer of some sort. If our goal is to drive sales or keep customers happy in some way, we first need to get them as part of our audience. If I have one regret as a business owner, it’s not focusing on building our email list earlier in the process.
The Offer Finally, if/when you send out those “money” emails (especially for re-marketing purposes, which we will discuss later on), you need to test out offers. An extra 15-days to try the product, or a $10 discount for being on the newsletter? Should you offer an incentive to those who have signed up but haven’t gotten started with your product, or just send a reminder? Find out the answers with split-testing!

We’ll warn you right now that as you’re evaluating different email platforms, you’ll likely be tempted to focus a lot of your attention on which platform has the prettiest email templates. This is understandable. But unless you have an e-commerce company and are selling a physical product online, the truth is that the visual aesthetics of your emails are not the most important factor.
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