Drip – Drip from Leadpages includes a visual campaign builder that allows businesses to design email campaigns based on their subscribers' actions, decisions, goals, delays and exits. Features include automation, a lead-scoring algorithm that tracks several events to determine which subscribers are most engaged with your content and likely to become customers, and the ability to send targeted emails. Drip integrates with a variety of CRM, e-commerce, forms and surveys, lead capture, marketing automation, and membership and payment processing tools. drip.com

These days, it’s very popular to use the Disqus for managing comments on your blog. I believe a better way to go about it though is just a plain old form like what I have at the bottom of this page. No only is it better to do it this way for SEO (Disqus loads comment text dynamically so you don’t get that extra text indexed by Google), but you can use the form where people are required to put in their email address as an opportunity to capture a new subscriber. Brian Dean over on BackLinko does this in the most transparent way on his blog comments section (see below)
Plus, the ROI is usually very high because you don’t have to put ad money behind emails to get them to the correct audience like you do with most other forms of advertising. They are already targeted towards the ideal consumer because you are only sending emails to people who have given you permission via providing you with their email address. This makes email marketing one of the cheapest possible marketing tactics.
John, Thank you for this comprehensive review of some of the most popular and well-used services. Over the last decade I have tried many and appreciate your perspective on each. I currently use GetResponse (as I’d not been as active and appreciate the price-value relationship for 1,000+ contacts. I know they’ve grown considerably and now offer many of the features of which you speak of other services you prefer. I would appreciate your updated 2018 review. THANK YOU!
The Content Upgrade is a tactic that’s been around for a while, probably popularized in more recent years due HubSpot (an inbound marketing company) practicing it on every one of their blog posts. The basic definition of a content upgrade is this: on every article you publish on your blog, you create a simple bonus or “extra” that a visitor can get access to by providing their email. The bonus offer is something related to what is discussed in the article. For example, last week I wrote about “Pumpkin Hacking” as it relates to SEO. In that article I posted links to download my “Pumpkin Hacking Checklist” which is a 4 page PDF download (and FYI, it’s less work than it sounds like — the 4 pages is mostly because I wrote in a large font). Of course, you don’t have to create a checklist as the upgrade:
This is a topic I plan to write more on in the future, but I’ll briefly summarize it here. When a little old website called Mint.com launched back around 2008, a quick glance at their footer links and you would notice something interesting. Each link had “rich anchor text” (meaning the words used for the link were purposefully chosen) and the pages they linked to were landing pages. Taking note of this strategy, when I launched my previous business, BlueSkyLocal.com, in 2009 I made sure we followed the same strategy (see below). The website was young and had few inbound links at the time. However, I knew that but crafting valuable (simple) landing pages with information that users on the web were searching for, we could naturally start to capture some organic traffic. And we did. The site still gets traffic today even though I haven’t touched it in years. Here’s what one of those landing pages looked like: The idea was that by branching off key pieces of content from our homepage (kind of like a sunflower plant branches petals our from its core), we driving more free trial sign-ups. And we did (until we made the Jenius move of removing our free trial option of course — but that’s a story for another day 😉  ) This strategy can work just as well for you when it comes to building your email list:
I always pause and laugh when I see a CTA with a small, “No thanks, I don’t want to lose weight,” button underneath a prominent “Yes, sign me up!” link. It reminds me there’s a person behind the button, and, while it’s meant to be a joke, it also incentivizes me to hesitate before clicking “no, thanks”. It’s easy to click “no” when the CTA is “sign up for more emails!”, but it’s a little harder to say no to losing weight or getting richer.
Email Newsletters – These are regular emails that are sent to a list of subscribers who have chosen to receive updates from a company. Newsletters usually don't have explicit sales messages, but try instead to build a relationship between a customer and a brand. They often have a conversational tone and contain news and information that will be of interest to the customer. The goal is to keep a customer connected to a company even when they are not buying anything.
I’ve opted in to lists that have anywhere from one to sixty messages already completed, queued, and ready to deliver. If you’re more hands-off you may want to write as many messages as you can up front to minimize your work on the back end. If you’re more involved in your business on a daily basis you may want to consider writing only one or two auto-responder messages and the rest live and delivered as a broadcast message. A broadcast message is one that’s sent immediately and not pre-scheduled.
Social media results are often better for brands when they use paid ads in combination with organic posts. The main reason for this is that social media channels like Facebook have access to a wealth of third-party data. This data allows you to reach a uniquely targeted group of consumers who are most likely to be interested in your holiday promotions.
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