I talked about generic exit-detection popups in an earlier point, but now let’s talk about a more advanced version of that email collection strategy. To review: Exit detection popups are a “smarter” form of email capture popup. It appears when it detects that the mouse from a visitor is moving off the page, towards the top, and he or she is probably about to hit the back button or type in a new web address (example below) There are a number of free options for this, but none of them work as well as the paid exit-detection popups that are out there. I personally use and recommend Optin Monster which costs $199. The biggest benefits to using something like Optin Monster is that you can A/B test your pop-ups AND set specific popups to appear on specific pages.  So, creating an exit-intent popup is a macro optimization you can make to your site, where as creating page-specific exit pop-ups is a micro optimization which leads to higher conversion rates as that individual pages level. Why? Well, think about it. If you’re reading an article about, say, building your email list and you see either

But engaging with a new customer isn’t a one-and-done affair. That’s why you want the ability to create an automated email sequence that “indoctrinates” new subscribers to your brand through a series of emails in the week or so after they sign up. This is just one of many instances where email sequencing can be the most powerful tool in your brand’s email marketing toolbox—so make sure the platform you choose has strong sequencing functionality!


Many people mistakenly believe that the only method for getting a professional quality website is to hire a web developer. But, by selecting the right website builder, you can achieve similar results for a much lower cost. Additionally, you maintain full control over the look of your website as you don’t have to rely on paying your original developer or finding a new one, every time you want to make a change.
Analyzing the emails of competing businesses can be a great way for companies to plan their own. This can be done easily by just signing up for their email lists. Competitor's emails reveal what kinds of images, messages and specials they are using to appeal to their customers. Businesses can then tailor their email campaigns to match or beat the offers of their competitors.
Improve brand recognition. Social media ads are also ideal for improving brand recognition. By placing ads on the social media platforms that your target audience frequents most, you can start to build up a larger fan base. The more familiar consumers are with your brand, the more likely they will be to make a purchase—especially when they come across your holiday sale. Try running a brand awareness campaign on Facebook prior to your big sale.

Now that you know the best practices for small business email marketing, you can work to build successful email marketing campaigns that help you connect with customers and leads while driving conversions. Start with a strategy for how you plan to engage your leads through email and develop content that is targeted to your ideal audience. Don’t forget to test different tactics and measure your success along the way. In the end, this will help you get more out of your marketing budget while maximizing engagement.

I learned list building from the legendary marketer Frank Kern (you’re welcome Frank!). Frank prefers to write and queue only one initial welcome message and the rest he delivers live as a broadcast message. This does take more work but keeps your messages timely, relevant, and news-worthy. Ultimately it’s up to you on how to implement your list strategy.
Not only is InVision's newsletter a great mix of content, but I also love the nice balance between images and text, making it really easy to read and mobile-friendly -- which is especially important, because its newsletters are so long. (Below is just an excerpt, but you can read through the full email here.) We like the clever copy on the call-to-action (CTA) buttons, too.
I haven’t heard of Feedblitz – just looking at their website now. Appears that they’re a Feedburner replacement specialising in RSS-to-email (sending your blog subscribers an email about latest posts). Their pricing looks a bit steep (considering Feedburner was free) – so I’d probably choose Mailchimp or Aweber over them? That way you can message up to a few thousand people free of charge.
The first known large-scale non-commercial spam message was sent on 18 January 1994 by an Andrews University system administrator, by cross-posting a religious message to all USENET newsgroups.[12] In January 1994 Mark Eberra started the first email marketing company for opt in email list under the domain Insideconnect.com. He also started the Direct Email Marketing Association to help stop unwanted email and prevent spam. [13] [14]
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