Email marketing has evolved rapidly alongside the technological growth of the 21st century. Prior to this growth, when emails were novelties to the majority of customers, email marketing was not as effective. In 1978, Gary Thuerk of Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) sent out the first mass email[1] to approximately 400 potential clients via the Advanced Research Projects Agency Network (ARPANET). He claims that this resulted in $13 million worth of sales in DEC products,[2] and highlighted the potential of marketing through mass emails.
In my premium flagship program, Virtual Summit Mastery, we make it as easy as possible for you for you to implement everything for your summit. You will get done-for-you email automation templates that you can use for the pre-summit promotion, during summit email and post-summit phase to communicate with your audience. They work seamlessly with ActiveCampaign so that you can import them with a few clicks, tweak the copy get them working for you. This is a game-changer for email marketing - you get the copy and tech automations all-in-one.
Get creative. Since every business is different, some of the strategies in this guide might not work for your business if you implement them exactly as described. However, most of what’s described can work for a large majority of businesses with just a few tweaks. In some cases, you might even get greater results than the people who wrote these posts.

In 2002 the European Union (EU) introduced the Directive on Privacy and Electronic Communications. Article 13 of the Directive prohibits the use of personal email addresses for marketing purposes. The Directive establishes the opt-in regime, where unsolicited emails may be sent only with prior agreement of the recipient; this does not apply to business email addresses.
MessageGears – MessageGears is a hybrid email marketing system that combines the security of an on-premises system with the scalability of the cloud. The service connects directly to any local or remote database, data warehouse, e-commerce system, or content management system. There is no need to extract, transform, or load customer data into the system or to move or replicate data. Features include subject line previews and testing, spam testing, and automation, drip and trigger campaigns. messagegears.com
Ever since I first time heard that you can get free traffic from a thing called Google, I wanted that. But, I had no idea where to start. And what was even worse, every “great” tip I’d receive from an “experts” was a complete BS that only sounds nice, but could never be used by real businesses. Most of those things are considered black-hat now. That’s how “great” those tips were.

The Content Upgrade is a tactic that’s been around for a while, probably popularized in more recent years due HubSpot (an inbound marketing company) practicing it on every one of their blog posts. The basic definition of a content upgrade is this: on every article you publish on your blog, you create a simple bonus or “extra” that a visitor can get access to by providing their email. The bonus offer is something related to what is discussed in the article. For example, last week I wrote about “Pumpkin Hacking” as it relates to SEO. In that article I posted links to download my “Pumpkin Hacking Checklist” which is a 4 page PDF download (and FYI, it’s less work than it sounds like — the 4 pages is mostly because I wrote in a large font). Of course, you don’t have to create a checklist as the upgrade:


Getting started shouldn't be daunting. Generally, you'll know right away whether you like a user interface (UI) or not, and most of the contenders we reviewed offer free trials so you can poke around before dropping any cash. Luckily, most of these services have modern-looking graphics and uncluttered layouts. These are not the complex business software UIs of yesterday. Be careful, though, as some free trials require a credit card. This means you need to be sure to cancel your trial before you're billed if you're not happy with the service.
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