Where they can improve: The automation editor lacks a workflow view, so isn’t the most intuitive to use. List management isn’t the best, either – it doesn’t remove duplicates and lists are kept isolated from another. It also has one of the strictest acceptable use policies, and isn’t ideal if your business deals with affiliate marketing, healthcare products, real estate or novelty products. And it’s certainly not the cheapest provider out there – surprising, given its popularity (which just goes to show the power of great marketing!). Note – we’ve noticed that emails from MailChimp tend to go to Gmail’s Promotions folder.

Imagine if your email marketing software could also act as your email marketing consultant, teaching you when to send your messages, how to segment your audience, and everything else you need to know to make the most of your efforts with email marketing. For small business owners with limited marketing knowledge who are bootstrapping their way through the email game, that’s exactly what GetResponse does.
Include social sharing buttons and an "Email to a Friend" button in your marketing emails. That way, you'll gain access to their friends, colleagues, and networks and expand your contact list. At the bottom of your emails, include a "Subscribe" CTA as a simple text-based link so that the people receiving the forwarded emails can easily opt-in, too.
I haven’t heard of Feedblitz – just looking at their website now. Appears that they’re a Feedburner replacement specialising in RSS-to-email (sending your blog subscribers an email about latest posts). Their pricing looks a bit steep (considering Feedburner was free) – so I’d probably choose Mailchimp or Aweber over them? That way you can message up to a few thousand people free of charge.
I recently purchased OptinMonster for our website. I’m very happy with SumoMe but the main benefits that Optin Monster has to offer that make it compelling are its nicely animated exit-intent plugins, as well as the ability to show specific pop-ups on specific pages AND to A/B split test them. If you’re not familiar with what an exit-intent pop-up is, it is a pop-up that shows only the moment that it detects a visitor is about to leave a web page. It understands this because it watches the visitors mouse movements and a mouse movement that is usually, quick, up and the the left tends to indicate that the visitor is about to leave the site. Here’s an example of what a high converting pop-up might look like, as shown by OptinMonster’s higher-end (and crazy expensive) competitor, Bounce Exchange.

3. Email converts better. People who buy products marketed through email spend 138% more than those who do not receive email offers. In fact, email marketing has an ROI of 3800%. That’s huge! And if you are wondering if social media converts even better, think again: the average order value of an email is at least three times higher than that of social media.
According to a study (PDF) published in the Journal of Consumer Research, people shy away from single option offers. However, when presented with multiple options, we are more likely to make a purchase decision on the spot (about 3x more likely in fact according the research). For this reason you want to consider giving people multiple options to optin for your offers. For example, here’s how I do it on our free course widget: Here’s another (perhaps even more effective) example from Michael Hyatt’s website. What I like about how Michael does it here is the fact that he truly give your two choices, not just two calls to action. One choice will sign-up immediately. The other will take you to a landing page where you can learn a little more and then optin there. Very smart, copy this on your own website.
Email can accommodate almost any message a marketer wants to send. For instance, UrbanDaddy.com, a nightlife website, ran a highly successful email marketing campaign by including large, eye catching images in the header of the email. The images were geared toward a young male demographic and gave the email context. They encouraged the reader to scroll down and engage with the sales messages contained in the body of the email. (See also Targeted Marketing)
Many email newsletter software vendors offer transactional email support, which gives companies the ability to include promotional messages within the body of transactional emails. There are also software vendors that offer specialized transactional email marketing services, which include providing targeted and personalized transactional email messages and running specific marketing campaigns (such as customer referral programs).[citation needed]
In contrast, the European Union's "Privacy and Electronic Communications Directive" restricts websites' ability to use consumer data much more comprehensively. The EU limitations restrict targeting by online advertisers; researchers have estimated online advertising effectiveness decreases on average by around 65% in Europe relative to the rest of the world.[60]:58

Wix ShoutOut – Wix ShoutOut is an email marketing solution for small businesses. It allows anyone to create, send and share newsletters, invitations, sale promotions and product updates that work across all devices. The software features an intuitive editor, custom sign-up forms, contact integration, social media tools and stat trackers. wix.com/shoutout/email-marketing
The first widely publicized example of online advertising was conducted via electronic mail. On 3 May 1978, a marketer from DEC (Digital Equipment Corporation), Gary Thuerk, sent an email to most of the ARPANET's American west coast users, advertising an open house for a new model of a DEC computer.[5][10] Despite the prevailing acceptable use policies, electronic mail marketing rapidly expanded[11] and eventually became known as "spam."
This strategy is pretty popular among more seasoned marketers like Ryan Deis (founder of DigitalMarketer.com) and others who are huge proponents of spending money on ads in order to acquire traffic (rather than doing content marketing or SEO, I mean who do that crazy stuff right? 😉 ) After they convert that traffic on a free offer, the newly opted-in subscribers are sent to a page that says “Thank You” with an offer to buy something (usually something inexpensive, less than $50 so it can be considered an “impulse buy.”). The reason for this is two-fold:
Many consumers have reservations about online behavioral targeting. By tracking users' online activities, advertisers are able to understand consumers quite well. Advertisers often use technology, such as web bugs and respawning cookies, to maximizing their abilities to track consumers.[60]:60[95] According to a 2011 survey conducted by Harris Interactive, over half of Internet users had a negative impression of online behavioral advertising, and forty percent feared that their personally-identifiable information had been shared with advertisers without their consent.[96][97] Consumers can be especially troubled by advertisers targeting them based on sensitive information, such as financial or health status.[95] Furthermore, some advertisers attach the MAC address of users' devices to their 'demographic profiles' so they can be retargeted (regardless of the accuracy of the profile) even if the user clears their cookies and browsing history.[citation needed]
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