Yes, when you log out of Ark, your body stays exactly where you left it in a perilous state of purgatory. If you have not used your survival building games know-how to put together a smartly designed base and protect yourself from the elements, prepare to see your progress swiftly eaten up. That counts for your food, farming supplies, and crafting equipment, too.
Now that you have your email software system in place (step 1) you’re ready for the next phase – the ethical bribe. The ethical bribe is simply something of value that you’ll exchange for the email addresses of the subscribers you want to attract. The ethical bribe is especially important now since people are becoming increasingly concerned about their online privacy. You’ll need a strong valuable freebie to get them to part with their email address.
The first step to starting an email marketing campaign is to gather an email list. Before a potential subscriber provides you with their email address, there are a few questions they are likely to consider. Will you spam them? What do they have to gain from giving you their email address? Will you send special discounts? Will you make their email address public or sell it? You’re going to want to make it clear to would-be subscribers that they will benefit from subscribing to your email list and you will not spam them or give anyone else their email address.
Consider this: the average open rate for email is 21.73 percent, while Facebook organic reach has decreased to about 6 percent. Think you might have better luck with Twitter? One marketer found that less than 2 percent of his followers actually see his tweets. So while social media may be an awesome tool for reaching new people, email may take the cake in terms of lead nurturing.
Presentation is everything, or so they say. With this old adage in mind, we’ve compiled our best tips for anyone who wants to send emails that subscribers click into a handy email design guide. We cover each facet of design: content, templates, identity, color, images, layout, fonts, and calls to action. Design is as much science as it is art, and we take the guesswork out of what can seem like the most challenging part of sending good emails.

Email marketing has evolved rapidly alongside the technological growth of the 21st century. Prior to this growth, when emails were novelties to the majority of customers, email marketing was not as effective. In 1978, Gary Thuerk of Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) sent out the first mass email[1] to approximately 400 potential clients via the Advanced Research Projects Agency Network (ARPANET). He claims that this resulted in $13 million worth of sales in DEC products,[2] and highlighted the potential of marketing through mass emails.


This relatively new email provider is steadily building a reputation for itself as a decent, value-for-money tool. Why? Because, for the low price you pay, you get a surprisingly generous amount of features, including landing pages, marketing automation and advanced segmentation. What’s more – MailerLite make the tool super accessible with an easy-to-use interface, and by offering a decently-featured free plan for up to 1,000 subscribers.
Many consumers have reservations about online behavioral targeting. By tracking users' online activities, advertisers are able to understand consumers quite well. Advertisers often use technology, such as web bugs and respawning cookies, to maximizing their abilities to track consumers.[60]:60[95] According to a 2011 survey conducted by Harris Interactive, over half of Internet users had a negative impression of online behavioral advertising, and forty percent feared that their personally-identifiable information had been shared with advertisers without their consent.[96][97] Consumers can be especially troubled by advertisers targeting them based on sensitive information, such as financial or health status.[95] Furthermore, some advertisers attach the MAC address of users' devices to their 'demographic profiles' so they can be retargeted (regardless of the accuracy of the profile) even if the user clears their cookies and browsing history.[citation needed]
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