Travel blogger @Anna Everywhere has an Instagram full of stunning photo shoots in amazing locations around the world. She is incredibly stylish, and many people send her messages asking where she buys her clothes, so to help with that - even though this is not the focus point of the picture, she will include a link to the product below the image. The image below is from Waikiki, and she mentions her bikini after everything she has to say about the location. She also doesn’t link to products in every single post that she does.
There will always be plenty of brands that reach out to you who don’t have budget beyond simply free gifting. When you’re first starting out, that’s only natural as you don’t yet have as much to offer when it comes to your online reach. Collaborating on a free gifting basis allows you to build up your credibility, your brand, and open the doors for future collaborations because you’re able to showcase that you make a great spokesperson for a brand. But there comes a point when ( a ) the novelty of getting stuff for free wears off and ( b ) you realize that you’re providing brands with something of value and that you should be fairly compensated for that. The expectation by so many brands that influencers do work for free is something that really irks me. In what other profession would you do work and not get paid for it, whether or not you’re just starting out in the industry? Sure, you might just make a little above minimum wage, but you’re definitely being paid something. Yes, smaller brands and those just starting out probably won’t have a huge marketing budget and I still sometimes work on a gifting basis if it’s a brand I firmly believe in and want to build a long-term relationship with. But when companies that have been around for years and have built up a successful brand themselves don’t value you and your work enough to feel you should be paid? It’s a slap in the face, to be honest. Ladies (and gentlemen), please know your worth and don’t feel pressure to do free (or underpaid) work. It’s better to say no and save yourself the time and hassle. When you say no to working for free, you’re leaving yourself open to collaborations with brands who are willing to pay you fairly. You only have a limited number of hours to do work each week and, most likely, you also have a limited number of sponsored posts you want to do each week to keep your Instagram feed and blog from appearing too sales-pitchy. Leave those coveting slots open for brands who value you.
Die haben NIRGENDS auch nur Andeutungen von „Werbung“. Nicht mal in den Datenschutz Texten steht „Amazon“ oder „Affiliate“ drin.. wtf? Die machen seit Jahren Millionen und sind somit für mich mehr als „Vorbildstauglich“ für die Szene. Ich würde mich ja nach deren Design richten, wenn ich es mich trauen würde. Kann man die vielleicht mal kurz vom tollen Staat untersuchen lassen, damit wir aus deren Urteil lernen können?
With the maturing of the affiliate marketing industry, we are witnessing the emergence of influencers. These could be gurus who conduct programs in affiliate marketing. Or they could be bloggers who specialize in writing about affiliate marketing. Or they could be affiliate marketers who openly share their secrets of success. If some of these influencers put in a good word for you, their credibility could end up giving you nice inroads into the affiliate marketing community.
The top Influencers may balk at this payment model since they are used to pay-per-post. But again, it’s much more likely that micro-influencers will be open to this model. And to sweeten the pot, you should offer an initial “signing bonus” of free products for them to have, and also a higher commission rate unique for these affiliate Influencers. If your usual commission rate is 10–20% for the average influencer, consider going as high as 50%. Even if the ROI isn’t quite 11X, but say 5X, it’s still well worth the commission costs.
Don’t Buy Fake Followers – Although brands might be impressed at first glance with your follower numbers, it won’t take long for them to realize that your audience isn’t worth paying for. A few clicks to check on engagement levels and how your followers have responded to your posts will tell them that you have bought your followers, not organically grown your audience. This isn’t the type of audience that will get results for businesses, and consequently, people won’t want to pay you to promote their posts.

We’ll use an example of a fictional fashion influencer, and we’ll call her Sally. Sally lives in Los Angeles and has around a million subscribers across her primary social media channels, Instagram, YouTube, and Snapchat. Now let’s pretend that you’re an advertiser for a boutique clothing line with a store located along the coast in Orange County looking to tap into a younger niche market. Influencers like Sally would be great to add leverage to your marketing since her promoting your brand would automatically gain credibility from her subscribers, in addition to increasing your customer base and conversions.


Eines dieser Instagram-Profile ist „Megachats“ mit 450.000 Followern. Die über 400 Beiträge bestehen größtenteils aus Screenshots von Whatsapp-Chats, die leidlich witzig sind, aber anscheinend perfekt bei der Zielgruppe funktionieren. Das Wachstum des Accounts ist beeindruckend: In den letzten 30 Tagen gewann Megachats laut dem Analysetool Socialblade über 60.000 Follower. Pro Tag kommen zwischen 1.500 und 3.000 Fans dazu. Offenbar betreibt derjenige oder diejenige hinter Megachats noch weitere Instagram-Kanäle und kommt insgesamt so auf über 1,8 Millionen Follower.
I don’t have experience with all that many influencer networks so I can’t give a comprehensive review or even list them all. Those that I’ve got decent to good experience with are Popular Pays (my favourite Instagram influencer app and where I got my very first paid gig last summer, with one of my favourite brands no less), Social Fabric (although most of their gigs are US only and they’re vigilant about that), Muse Find and Revfluence. I also signed up for the following networks, but haven’t gotten much (or even any) work through them: Collabor8, Collectively, IZEA, Linqia, Nichify, and TapInfluence. Some of these don’t pay well versus others I just haven’t been contacted much, which could be because I’m based in Canada and a lot of these influencer networks focus on US brands who want US influencers (even though my reach in the US is about the same as fellow US-based mom bloggers).
Now, each product promoted on Instagram can have a direct link to its products page either on Etsy, Amazon, an online store or somewhere else. This makes it easy for Instagrammers to immediately purchase something that has caught their eye as they are browsing their feed. And it makes it much much easier for eCommerce stores to drive traffic and sales from their Instagram posts.
Immer mehr Werbetreibende entscheiden sich gegen die klassische und für die Social Media Werbung. Aktuelle Zahlen sprechen eine deutliche Sprache: Im Rahmen einer umfangreichen Studie wurden deutsche Internetnutzer ab 14 Jahren Ende 2017 befragt, welche Werbeplattform sie zu einem Kauf bewegt hat. 23 Prozent der Befragten gaben die klassische TV-Reklame an, während es das soziale Netzwerk Facebook sogar auf 24 Prozent schaffte. Nicht nur Facebook, Twitter und YouTube sind lohnenswerte Plattformen für Unternehmen, sondern auch der weltbekannte Online-Dienst Instagram.
William Harris is leading content at Sellbrite and is also the Founder & Growth Marketer of Elumynt, LLC., VP of Marketing and Growth for a top 700 online retailer and former head of Marketing for When I Work, a VC backed SaaS company. William is also a contributor to leading publications like The Next Web, Search Engine Journal, Social Media Today, and Sellbrite and a speaker at industry events covering topics such as marketing strategy, search engine optimization, content marketing, digital marketing, social media and personal branding. Follow William on Twitter (@WmHarris101), LinkedIn, and Google+.
I promote many products and services, so I wouldn’t want to use my link to market only one. On the other hand, you might be focused and very passionate about promoting one item. You could add your affiliate link—shortened, cloaked or branded—to your profile or create an account specifically for that item. For instance, you’re passionate about writing and want to promote Grammarly, a free grammar checker, and vocabulary enhancement app. You create an account called @awesomewriter and posts writing tips and motivational quotes. Your bio reads, “Improve your writing with this free software app. Click below to learn more. #Ad.”
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